Orange/yellow fungi

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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Louie1
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Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2023 10:05 am

Orange/yellow fungi

Post by Louie1 »

Hello,

I found these fungi in early January in a field that has been grazed by horses. The first set of images are from fungi in a field where I had found parrot and snowy waxcaps and what I think may be large pinkgills.
The 2nd set of images are fungi very close to a native hedge. Apologies for quality of stem and gills image.

Any help with identification would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks
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Pinkgill?
Pinkgill?
Pinkgill spore print
Pinkgill spore print
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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Orange/yellow fungi

Post by Lancashire Lad »

Hi,

The top three photos have the general looks of Galerina graminea - Turf Bell

The next four photos have some similarity in general looks and gill structure to Tubaria furfuracea - Scurfy Twiglet, but I'm by no means certain.
Knowing what substrate mushrooms are growing on is a very useful characteristic, and can often narrow down the list of possibles when trying to identify species.
For example, Tubaria furfuracea grows on twigs or woody debris, occasionally on woodchip, rather than directly from soil.

The final two photos could well be one of the Entoloma (pinkgill) species, but good clear photos of all macro characteristics including underside of cap, gill attachment, entirety of stem, etc. etc. would be an absolute minimum, (and even then, microscopy would almost certainly be necessary)

Please see this post, for the type of information which is needed by those who might respond to your requests for identifications: -
HELP US TO HELP YOU TO IDENTIFY YOUR FINDS https://www.fungi.org.uk/viewtopic.php?t=49

Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.
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