Morchella esculenta or Gyromitra?

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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sp515507
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Morchella esculenta or Gyromitra?

Post by sp515507 »

I found this specimen in the local community garden in Angus, on a path made from shredded plant material from various sources. I thought at first it was Gyromitra esculenta, since I have found that species in my own garden, but on looking it up I am inclining towards true morel since it has a hollow head and honeycomb ridges.
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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Morchella esculenta or Gyromitra?

Post by Lancashire Lad »

Definitely a Morchella and not Gyromitra esculenta.

The most obvious macroscopic difference between the two is that Morchella esculenta has narrow ridges between quite defined "pits" on the cap. Whereas Gyromitra esculenta has smoother, rounded and contorted margins around irregular hollows on the cap. (More like a human brain :D ).

I wouldn't put too much emphasis on the cap being hollow or not as a positive indicator of species. - Yes, Morchella esculenta usually has a more or less entirely hollow cap, and Gyromitra esculenta usually has several smaller hollow chambers, but I have seen Gyromitra esculenta with solid caps, and also with almost entirely hollow caps.

In more natural habitats, Morchella esculenta is usually found with deciduous trees, and Gyromitra esculenta with conifer trees. - But both species have also been found in less typical situations where woodchip etc. might have been used as mulch.

Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.
sp515507
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Re: Morchella esculenta or Gyromitra?

Post by sp515507 »

Thank you so much! I’ve never seen Morchella, except in books.
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