Penicillium vulpinum

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Chris Johnson
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Penicillium vulpinum

Post by Chris Johnson » Sat Apr 11, 2020 4:12 pm

A synnematoid hyphomycete growing on deer dung.
Overall height 290-350 µm.
Width of stipe 39 µm.
Conidia 3.6-5.1 x 2.3-3.2 µm.
The best I can come up with is Penicillium vulpinum.
Any thought welcome.
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Chris Yeates
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Re: Penicillium vulpinum

Post by Chris Yeates » Sun Apr 12, 2020 2:01 pm

Hi Chris
Do you have “A Key To Hyphomycetes On Dung” by Seifert, Kendrick and Murase; University of Waterloo, (1983)?
They list and describe P. vulpinum (as Penicillium claviforme Bainier). I can send you a pdf if you don't have it.

Regards
Chris
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
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Chris Johnson
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Re: Penicillium vulpinum

Post by Chris Johnson » Sun Apr 12, 2020 2:20 pm

Chris Yeates wrote: Sun Apr 12, 2020 2:01 pm Hi Chris
Do you have “A Key To Hyphomycetes On Dung” by Seifert, Kendrick and Murase; University of Waterloo, (1983)?
They list and describe P. vulpinum (as Penicillium claviforme Bainier). I can send you a pdf if you don't have it.

Regards
Chris
I came across the title but I don't have it, so thank you.
Still working on t'other.

Best wishes, Chris

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Re: Penicillium vulpinum

Post by Chris Johnson » Mon Apr 13, 2020 7:46 am

Hi Chris

Thanks for the key - very comprehensive.
The first couplet "conidiophores aggregated into synnematal (columnar) conidiomata" took me to 147, a few simple steps later and P. claviforme.
It does seem conclusive.

Regards, Chris

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Re: Penicillium vulpinum

Post by Paul Cannon » Mon Apr 13, 2020 10:31 am

Hello all
I've been reluctant to leap in here, but here goes...

The good news is that you clearly have a species of Penicillium. That's most of the good news.

The bad news is that there are lots (maybe hundreds) of species, which have been studied almost exclusively in pure culture. That makes things look a bit different (and so would you, if you'd spent your entire life in jelly). Almost any species might be found on dung. Information on growth rates in defined conditions, metabolite production as well as micromorphology would normally be expected, not to mention DNA. If you're feeling brave, you could investigate the online key here - http://penicillium.mycobank.org/ You may need to make some more detailed measurements of spores, conidiogenous cells etc.

The slightly better news is that there are relatively few species that produce synnemata (called coremia in the Penicillium world for some reason). Your species might be P. vulpinum (the preferred name, not claviforme). However, in my experience the synnemata tend to be more robust (though that could be a culture-related phenomenon). Another option might be P. ulaiense (see e.g. https://www.forestryimages.org/browse/d ... um=1570453) which is best known as a deteriogen of citrus fruit but could occur in all sorts of habitats. There are others...

My best advice would be to identify this as Penicillium sp., and mention P. vulpinum and P. ulaiense as possible IDs in the notes.

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Re: Penicillium vulpinum

Post by Chris Johnson » Mon Apr 13, 2020 12:30 pm

Hello Paul

Please leap in anytime, I'm often floundering ... :) Chris Y tries to keep me honest.

My main misgiving with Penicillium vulpinum was that it didn't 'look' like any images I've seen. Perhaps a result of culturing, as you suggest. I must say, from a macro point of view, Penicillium ulaiense looks more likely. I'll not take it any further but catalogue it as you suggest.

Many thanks, Chris

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Re: Penicillium vulpinum

Post by Radu Morosanu » Sun Mar 21, 2021 9:57 am

Chris Yeates wrote: Sun Apr 12, 2020 2:01 pm Hi Chris
Do you have “A Key To Hyphomycetes On Dung” by Seifert, Kendrick and Murase; University of Waterloo, (1983)?
They list and describe P. vulpinum (as Penicillium claviforme Bainier). I can send you a pdf if you don't have it.

Regards
Chris
Hi Chris,
It seems like the only place online where i could find the name of this species and i have a lot more unidentified. I work on my bachelor's thesis right now and that book would help me a lot. So would you be so kind to send me a copy? I'd really appreciate it.

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Re: Penicillium vulpinum

Post by bojan » Tue Apr 06, 2021 6:19 am

Hi Chris!
i also found a similar one on deer dung with the same microscopy. Did you find out if it is Penicillium ulaiense?
Thanks!
Bojan
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Re: Penicillium vulpinum

Post by Chris Johnson » Tue Apr 06, 2021 5:34 pm

Hi Bojan, welcome to the group.

No, I didn't. I followed Paul Cannon's advise, above.

Regards, chris

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