ID Please

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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SirSpoolsaLot
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ID Please

Post by SirSpoolsaLot » Mon Nov 09, 2020 7:47 pm

Hi there.

Found in Pine Needle mulch at the foot of a mature Pine in shade.

Small grouping of 7 or 8 in varying states of maturity.
No volva but VERY pronounced skirts.

No particular smell.

Thanks 🙏

JB
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Chris Yeates
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Re: ID Please

Post by Chris Yeates » Mon Nov 09, 2020 9:15 pm

Hi

Have a look at Tricholoma cingulatum; but that is a Salix associate - any willows nearby? Given that you're in France there may possibly be relatives we don't have in the UK, though I don't think any of the possibles have so marked a ring. BTW when handling fungi try to avoid touching the stems as much as possible - handle with index finger on cap and thumb on the (carefully lifted) stem base. This is especially true if one intends microscope work on genera like Inocybe, Galerina and Conocybe.

Also I don't see the need to photograph a fungus while it is being held - not aimed at you in particular, most beginners seem to do it. Place in in typical habitat and photograph then, with a scale or coin, or just indicate dimensions.
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

SirSpoolsaLot
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Re: ID Please

Post by SirSpoolsaLot » Tue Nov 10, 2020 8:16 am

Thanks Chris.

Good info and Wilco on the handling.
I’ll investigate further.

Cheers.

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adampembs
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Re: ID Please

Post by adampembs » Tue Nov 10, 2020 4:54 pm

Also, please dont pull them all up! It's only necessary to pull one up for the photo. :cry:
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SirSpoolsaLot
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Re: ID Please

Post by SirSpoolsaLot » Tue Nov 10, 2020 5:41 pm

I wondered about that.

My reasoning was that these are just the fruiting bodies of a larger subterranean structure?
Do i damage the organism by grabbing them all?

Thanks chaps 👍
Josh

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adampembs
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Re: ID Please

Post by adampembs » Wed Nov 11, 2020 12:18 am

You don't damage the mycelium. But you limit it's ability to spread its spores to new locations.
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Chris Yeates
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Re: ID Please

Post by Chris Yeates » Wed Nov 11, 2020 12:34 am

adampembs wrote: Wed Nov 11, 2020 12:18 am You don't damage the mycelium. But you limit it's ability to spread its spores to new locations.
Personally I generally tend to collect specimens only when I intend to take them home for microscope work. However - if I have picked a toadstool to check something else then I look for forks in adjacent twigs/branches and place the fungus there, trying to keep it as horizontal as possible. It will still be spreading spores as it dries, but actually that drying process will encourage spore production and the elevated site will greatly help spore spreading as well. After that the environment takes over . . .
Chris
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

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