Possibly Solenopsora holophaea ????

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CJohnsonOHBR
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Possibly Solenopsora holophaea ????

Post by CJohnsonOHBR » Thu Oct 08, 2020 5:20 pm

This lichen was collected from Lingeigh, a small island off the north coast of North Uist, Outer Hebrides (NF8778), on 28 september 2020. I was not present, so I have no detailed knowledge of the habitat, but I suspect it was a peaty crevice. The island is Lewisian gneiss (siliceous) covered with peat.
The lichen comprises small, tightly overlapping, squamules with smooth rounded margins with some indentations.
The upper surface is green when wet, drying to a pale brown. The lower surace is white to beige/pale creamy brown with scattered pale rhizines.
The photobiont is chlorococcoid - present as globose cells
There are no isidia, soredia or apothecia.
Chemistry: K-, C-, KC-, Pd- and UV-.
I came to a halt in the generic key for squamulose/placoid lichens in Smith when I came to apothecia and ascospores (couplet 25, p49).
I looked at each of the suggest options (deponding on the nature of the ascospores) and managed to exclude all but 3 species Lecidoma demissum, Psoroma hypnorum and Solenopsora holophaea. I have not seen any of these species, but the latter 2 have been recorded in the Outer Hebrides.
I have spent ages looking at photographs and reading descriptions on-line and in my reference books, and I think the best-fit is Solenopsora holophaea. Equally, I could have gone astray in they key and it's something completely different.
I know that as it is sterile, that the best advice is to put it on the compost or in an envelope just in case I ever find some more, but having spent so much time on it, I'd appreciate an opinion.
I am sorry that the photographs are not wonderful.
I appreciate the time you devote to answering queries, and I always learn something from your comments.
Many thanks
Christine
Attachments
Solenopsora-1.jpg
solenopsora-2.jpg
Solenopsora-3.jpg

AlanFUSA
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Re: Possibly Solenopsora holophaea ????

Post by AlanFUSA » Thu Oct 08, 2020 6:27 pm

Hi Christine:
Well it's definitely not Lecidoma demissum or Psoroma hypnorum and it could be Solenopsora holophaeae, so I think you're on the right track. The habitat fits better for S. holophaea as well.
Alan

Neil Sanderson
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Re: Possibly Solenopsora holophaea ????

Post by Neil Sanderson » Thu Oct 08, 2020 8:34 pm

Christine

I agree with Alan definitely not Lecidoma demissum or Psoroma hypnorum and looks very like Solenopsora holophaea, I can not think of what else it could be. It would be obvious if fertile.

Neil
Neil Sanderson

Paul Cannon
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Re: Possibly Solenopsora holophaea ????

Post by Paul Cannon » Fri Oct 09, 2020 9:52 am

Hi Christine
I hope the specimen is not on the compost pile just yet!
I agree that Solenopsora holophaea is a possibility, but the thallus lobes look a bit thick for that species (I've put some more images on FGBI here - http://fungi.myspecies.info/all-fungi/s ... -holophaea - and invite others to check the IDs) Could there have been shell sand involved? If so you might have got one of the squamulose Verrucariaceae, possibly Placidium squamulosum which has been recorded from VC110. I say this because there are a few crateriform structures on your images (see arrow) which could be ostioles of perithecia. Or they could be pycnidia, which won't help since both species have immersed pycnidia and there isn't enough information on them to decide on an ID based on them alone...
Such fun...

Paul
Untitled-1.jpg

CJohnsonOHBR
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Re: Possibly Solenopsora holophaea ????

Post by CJohnsonOHBR » Fri Oct 09, 2020 1:39 pm

Thank you Alan and Neil,
It is reassuring to know that I'm not too far adrift.

Christine

CJohnsonOHBR
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Re: Possibly Solenopsora holophaea ????

Post by CJohnsonOHBR » Fri Oct 09, 2020 2:02 pm

Thank you Paul.
It's not on the compost yet, and is probably destined for an envelope with the name of Brian Coppins on the outside.
I looked at your site and I also looked at Placidium squamulosum, but I think I rejected it because of habitat; the record for VC110 is from Harris and a very sandy site. There is a possibility of the presence of shell sand on Lingeigh, although the specimen I received was deeply embedded in peat, and I was assured by the collector that the habitat is peat over bedrock and not machair.
I looked at the "craters" and decided that they were probably pycnidia, although the sections were inconclusive. I struggled to get good sections because the squamules were very small and very overlapped. I will have another go and see if I can get some decent sections, and also measure the size of the squamules again.
Chris is a far superior microscopist, so he might help me out and take some photographs.

Christine

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