some sort of Agaricaceae ?

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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irturner
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some sort of Agaricaceae ?

Post by irturner » Fri Oct 11, 2019 7:30 pm

side of track in mixed woodland in NW Leicestershire amongst deciduous .
Was thinking wood mushroom but not sure if the uneven top surface is due to decay or one of the parasols
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wood mushroom 1b.jpg
wood mushroom 1a.jpg
wood mushroom 1.jpg

jayman
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Re: some sort of Agaricaceae ?

Post by jayman » Fri Oct 11, 2019 11:03 pm

I'm no expert but looks like a false death cap to me.

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adampembs
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Re: some sort of Agaricaceae ?

Post by adampembs » Sat Oct 12, 2019 12:00 am

Definitely an Amanita, and I would agree on Amanita citrina. Its should smell like old potatoes.
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irturner
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Re: some sort of Agaricaceae ?

Post by irturner » Sat Oct 12, 2019 8:29 am

Thanks. I missed that one as the site I use for local stuff had pictures that on a cursory inspection looked like one of the variety with tufts rather than the irregular surface.

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Re: some sort of Agaricaceae ?

Post by admin » Sat Oct 12, 2019 3:35 pm

Start with spore colour which can often be guessed from gill colour. These gills are white. This means they have either pale coloured spores or that the spores are immature or not yet formed. As this looks mature, we can assume it has pale spores. This rules out the genus Agaricus.

It's not much use to field collectors talking about families with fungi. The family Agaricaceae for example, includes very diverse fungi: puffballs and earthballs, Lepiota (a white spored genus) as well as Coprinus (inkcap) and Agaricus.

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Chris Yeates
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Re: some sort of Agaricaceae ?

Post by Chris Yeates » Sat Oct 12, 2019 5:57 pm

Just taking the ring for a moment, the (single) rings on the Amanita species which have them originate as a protection, in contact with the gills, often the pattern made by the gills can be seen on their upper surface. As the cap expands the ring remains as a veil attached to the stem.

The (double) ring on the parasols detaches at an earlier stage and is not permanently attached; indeed it is often possible in mature specimens to move the ring up and down the stem.

These are the sort of characters to routinely make a note of as one is learning.
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

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