What are these?

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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jimmy J
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What are these?

Post by jimmy J » Fri Oct 11, 2019 3:43 pm

Can anyone tell me what these are please.
Not seen it before and it is growing in the mossy grass around my garden.
Noticed them in a large cluster whilst taking the bins out.
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Lancashire Lad
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Re: What are these?

Post by Lancashire Lad » Fri Oct 11, 2019 4:18 pm

Hi and welcome to UK Fungi.

You had tagged your request onto an existing identification request thread by another member, so I've split it away to form this new topic.
(Not best practice to add unrelated requests to existing topics!).

Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.

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adampembs
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Re: What are these?

Post by adampembs » Fri Oct 11, 2019 5:19 pm

The last one is parrot Waxcap, usually found on unfertilised grassland. Many mycologists are now worried about the state of the waxcaps as they appear to be declining.
Another one looks like one of the Pinkgills (Entoloma species), also found in the same habitat. Microscopy needed to be sure of species.

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Adam Pollard
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Flaxton
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Re: What are these?

Post by Flaxton » Sun Oct 13, 2019 10:25 am

Put one of the caps, gills down, on a piece of white paper over night. If they are Entolomas they should leave a pink spore print.
Mal

Peachysteve
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Re: What are these?

Post by Peachysteve » Mon Oct 14, 2019 5:59 am

The shiny dark one looks like Slimy Waxcap (Hygrocybe irrigata now Gliophorus irrigatus)

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