Possible Mazegill Gloeophyllum

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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Bob Hazell
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Possible Mazegill Gloeophyllum

Post by Bob Hazell » Wed Dec 05, 2018 1:00 pm

I photographed this fungus at Draycote Water, Warwickshire yesterday although it has been present for a little while. The centre of the upperside is dark brown although initially it was more orange. The rim is slightly inflated and a bright golden orange. It has rounded elongated pores. It is currently about 12cm across and about 1cm thick. It is growing in a crack in one of the car park perimeter fencing "rails" and I have been unable to ascertain the type of wood used (other than it's been there many years). It appears similar to many Mazegill photographs but the most similar e.g Gleoephyllum odoratum are rare, so I suspect it is something else. Any pointers to identification would be much appreciated.
P1320855web.jpg
P1320860web.jpg

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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Possible Mazegill Gloeophyllum

Post by Lancashire Lad » Wed Dec 05, 2018 1:55 pm

Hi Bob,

I'm not overly familiar with Gloeophyllum species, but i'd be tempted to think that this is likely to be Gloeophyllum sepiarium.

As you say, Gloeophyllum odoratum is rare, with only 14 records, and likewise, the other two "British" species, G.abietinum, and G.trabeum have only 19 and 21 records respectively (on the FRDBI).

G.sepiarium however, has 797 records, so much more common.
It is found on conifer wood - frequently on worked timber such as fence posts/rails etc.

I have a couple of images of G.sepiarium which are quite similar to your find: -
Conifer Mazegill - Gloeophyllum sepiarium.jpg
Gloeophyllum sepiarium.
Conifer Mazegill (2) - Gloeophyllum sepiarium.jpg
Gloeophyllum sepiarium.
Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.

mollisia
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Re: Possible Mazegill Gloeophyllum

Post by mollisia » Wed Dec 05, 2018 2:06 pm

Hello,

yes, definitely Gloeophyllum sepiarium.
It is causing a severe brown rot and when you see the fruitbodies you can already start to look for a substitute for your fence or whatever, as the attacked timber will break into pieces soon.

best regards,
Andreas

Bob Hazell
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Re: Possible Mazegill Gloeophyllum

Post by Bob Hazell » Wed Dec 05, 2018 2:57 pm

Hello Mike and Andreas,

Thank you both so much for taking the time to respond. Pleased that I correctly identified the fungus as Gloeophyllum but was really struggling beyond that. Now that you have indicated sepiarium I have located several similar photographs. As always in awe of your knowledge. Thanks again.

Regards,
Bob

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Chris Yeates
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Re: Possible Mazegill Gloeophyllum

Post by Chris Yeates » Wed Dec 05, 2018 5:55 pm

Hi Bob
You say "the centre of the upperside is dark brown although initially it was more orange". This can be down to moisture content - compare the image at top left to the ones taken of part of the same basidiome when it had dried out:
Gloeophyllum sepiarium 0a.jpg
Cheers
Chris
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Bob Hazell
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Re: Possible Mazegill Gloeophyllum

Post by Bob Hazell » Thu Dec 06, 2018 1:42 pm

Hi Chris,
Thanks for the further clarification. I wasn't sure whether it was part of the maturing process or not. Moisture sounds like a far more credible reason. Thank you.
Bob

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