Fungi in the Landscape

User avatar
Chris Johnson
Frequent user
Posts: 257
Joined: Sun Jul 26, 2015 2:06 pm
Location: Outer Hebrides
Contact:

Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by Chris Johnson » Sat Jan 16, 2016 12:16 pm

Leif wrote:Hello Chris, yes I used a D200 (crop DX sensor) with ~20mm lens for the first and a D600 (FX sensor) with a 28mm lens for the second. As I'm sure you know a smaller sensor gives more depth of field and a wider field of view at a given focal length.

I'm impressed with the other photos in this thread, and would be very interested to hear what camera and lens was used by others.
Thanks, Leif.

My wife took the one I posted with her Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ200. I tend to keep the macro lens on my field camera. I do want to take some 'fungi in landscape' images so will experiment with the kit lens which starts at 18mm.

Chris

User avatar
Lancashire Lad
Frequent user
Posts: 861
Joined: Wed May 13, 2015 11:59 am
Location: Red Rose County
Contact:

Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by Lancashire Lad » Sat Jan 16, 2016 6:25 pm

Here are some of mine, taken with the Fuji Finepix HS10.
For this type of shot, the lens is always set to the widest end of its zoom range, (i.e. 24mm), and with aperture priority set at F8.
Long exposures aren't usually a problem as I use a tripod whenever possible. On the few occasions that I can't get the tripod into the right position, I will make use of anything that happens to be nearby to support the camera. Hand holding is the last resort!
I always use the camera's self timer (set at 2 seconds) to trigger the shutter.

Regards,
Mike.
Attachments
Candlesnuff Fungus - Xylaria hypoxylon.jpg
Xylaria hypoxylon - Candlesnuff Fungus
Beige Coral - Clavulinopsis umbrinella.jpg
Clavulinopsis umbrinella - Beige Coral
Phallus duplicatus.jpg
Phallus duplicatus
Shaggy Inkcap - Coprinus comatus.jpg
Coprinus comatus - Shaggy Inkcap
Elfin Saddle - Helvella lacunosa.jpg
Helvella lacunosa - Elfin Saddle
Common Inkcap - Coprinopsis atramentaria.jpg
Coprinopsis atramentaria - Common Inkcap
Buttercap - Collybia butyracea var. asema.jpg
Rhodocollybia butyracea - Buttercap
Dryads Saddle - Polyporus squamosus.jpg
Polyporus squamosus - Dryad's Saddle
Cep - Boletus edulis.jpg
Boletus edulis - Cep (Penny Bun)
Common sense is not so common.

Leif
Frequent user
Posts: 546
Joined: Mon Jul 13, 2015 9:09 am
Location: East Hampshire

Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by Leif » Sat Jan 16, 2016 8:15 pm

Fantastic pictures Mike especially the Penny Buns.

User avatar
Chris Johnson
Frequent user
Posts: 257
Joined: Sun Jul 26, 2015 2:06 pm
Location: Outer Hebrides
Contact:

Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by Chris Johnson » Sun Jan 17, 2016 8:13 am

Outstanding, Mike.

Ditiola
User
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed May 27, 2015 5:15 pm

Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by Ditiola » Sun Jan 17, 2016 11:42 pm

Hi

These habitat shots are something I have always liked, and there are some super examples above. Here are a few that I have taken

Peter
Amanita muscaria  4.jpg
Morchella elater.jpg
Amanita muscaria  4.jpg
Clitocybe geotropa.jpg
Lepista panaeolus.jpg
Lycoperdon perlatum.jpg

User avatar
Chris Johnson
Frequent user
Posts: 257
Joined: Sun Jul 26, 2015 2:06 pm
Location: Outer Hebrides
Contact:

Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by Chris Johnson » Mon Jan 18, 2016 8:07 am

Ditiola wrote:Hi

These habitat shots are something I have always liked, and there are some super examples above. Here are a few that I have taken

Peter
These are excellent. Peter.

Do you use a dedicated wide-angle lens or is it part of a zoom complex?

Regards, Chris

User avatar
FungiJohn
Regular user
Posts: 69
Joined: Mon May 18, 2015 8:05 pm

Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by FungiJohn » Mon Jan 18, 2016 10:24 am

Some excellent examples showing fungi in the Lanscape. All these make a fine collection indeed.

Best Wishes - John

Ditiola
User
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed May 27, 2015 5:15 pm

Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by Ditiola » Mon Jan 18, 2016 7:03 pm

Chris Johnson wrote:
Ditiola wrote:Hi

These habitat shots are something I have always liked, and there are some super examples above. Here are a few that I have taken

Peter
These are excellent. Peter.

Do you use a dedicated wide-angle lens or is it part of a zoom complex?

Regards, Chris

Hi Chris

I use an Olympus 7 _ 14 mm I bought it second hand a few years ago. But to buy new now would cost a small fortune. It still performs well at f22 and has very little barrel distortion even at 7mm

User avatar
Chris Johnson
Frequent user
Posts: 257
Joined: Sun Jul 26, 2015 2:06 pm
Location: Outer Hebrides
Contact:

Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by Chris Johnson » Mon Jan 18, 2016 7:37 pm

Ditiola wrote:Hi Chris

I use an Olympus 7 _ 14 mm I bought it second hand a few years ago. But to buy new now would cost a small fortune. It still performs well at f22 and has very little barrel distortion even at 7mm
Thanks Peter, that's helpful.

Leif
Frequent user
Posts: 546
Joined: Mon Jul 13, 2015 9:09 am
Location: East Hampshire

Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by Leif » Mon Jan 18, 2016 8:33 pm

Ditiola wrote: I use an Olympus 7 _ 14 mm I bought it second hand a few years ago. But to buy new now would cost a small fortune. It still performs well at f22 and has very little barrel distortion even at 7mm
Lovely photos. I was surprised to find that my Nikon 28mm lens only stopped down to F16, most disappointing. Out of interest which focal length did you tend to use for the photos you posted?

Steve
Frequent user
Posts: 460
Joined: Sun May 17, 2015 8:59 pm
Location: Sheffield, Yorkshire

Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by Steve » Thu Feb 04, 2016 4:54 am

Here are some NE Derbyshire woodland "funi in the landscape" from a survey done last autumn.
Steve
Attachments
Armillaria and Ganoderma.JPG
Stump fungi - Honey Fungus and Ganoderma resinaceum
Mycena inclinata - Clustered Bonnet.JPG
Clustered Bonnet in an Ancient Woodland

Steve
Frequent user
Posts: 460
Joined: Sun May 17, 2015 8:59 pm
Location: Sheffield, Yorkshire

Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by Steve » Sun Feb 28, 2016 4:49 pm

Flammulina velutipes - Velvet Shank or Winter Fungus, by a disused railway in the Peak District.
Steve
Velvet Shank.jpg

Post Reply