Bright orange rust on unknown plant

Plant diseases
Post Reply
User avatar
adampembs
Frequent user
Posts: 1540
Joined: Wed May 13, 2015 11:40 am
Location: Pembrokeshire
Contact:

Bright orange rust on unknown plant

Post by adampembs » Wed Jul 01, 2015 6:48 pm

No idea what this plant is, growing in fen. Nearby is alder+willow carr. Can anyone help? The fungus is quite striking!
P1010244.JPG
P1010243.JPG
P1010242.JPG
P1010241.JPG
Adam Pollard
Site admin

User avatar
Lancashire Lad
Frequent user
Posts: 885
Joined: Wed May 13, 2015 11:59 am
Location: Red Rose County
Contact:

Re: Bright orange rust on unknown plant

Post by Lancashire Lad » Wed Jul 01, 2015 6:57 pm

Hi Adam,

Nice one! (great photos too!)

The plant looks like Meadowsweet Filipendula ulmaria.

If so, that would make the rust the aecidial stage of either Triphragmium filipendulae, or Triphragmium ulmariae.

Details for both in Wilson & Henderson - British Rust Fungi" - 1966 :-

Triphragmium filipendulae
Aecidia uredinoid amphigenous, usually on the petioles or nerves where they cause distortion, orange, 0-5-2 cm. long, pulverulent; aecidiospores variable in shape, ellipsoid, ovoid or piriform, contents orange, 22-28x16-22µ, wall hyaline about 2p thick, echinulate, pores indistinct.

Triphragmium ulmariae
Aecidia uredinoid, amphigenous, usually on the veins and petioles where they cause distortion, large, irregularly extended, without paraphyses, slightly pulverulent, orange-yellow; aecidiospores ellipsoid to obovoid, contents orange, 25-28 x 18-21µ, wall colourless, echinulate grading to smooth at the base, 2-3µ thick.

Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.

User avatar
Chris Yeates
Frequent user
Posts: 848
Joined: Tue May 26, 2015 7:01 pm
Location: Huddersfield, West Yorkshire

Re: Bright orange rust on unknown plant

Post by Chris Yeates » Wed Jul 01, 2015 7:49 pm

Definitely F. ulmaria and therefore has to be Triphragmium ulmariae
Catch this later in the season and, a bit like with Trachyspora, the telia are less striking, but the teliospores are pretty cool - and rather give away the Tri-phragmium bit:
Triphragmium ulmariae.jpg
cheers
Chris
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

User avatar
adampembs
Frequent user
Posts: 1540
Joined: Wed May 13, 2015 11:40 am
Location: Pembrokeshire
Contact:

Re: Bright orange rust on unknown plant

Post by adampembs » Wed Jul 01, 2015 7:51 pm

Thanks Mike :D
From what I'm reading, it looks like Triphragmium filipendulae is restricted to F. vulgaris, making this Triphragmium ulmariae

EDIT: I think our posts crossed, Chris. I'll keep a look out for the telia!

I see no sign of spore ornamentation. I've looked at them in water, Melzers and L cotton blue and can see no see of being echinulate. Spores are 25-30 x 22-28µm. I suppose these are uredospores and perhaps only the teliaspores and aecidiospores are echinulate.

P1100583.JPG
Triphragmium ulmariae
spores in water
P1100582.JPG
Triphragmium ulmariae
spores in Melzers
P1100581.JPG
Triphragmium ulmariae
spores in lactophenol cotton blue
Adam Pollard
Site admin

User avatar
Lancashire Lad
Frequent user
Posts: 885
Joined: Wed May 13, 2015 11:59 am
Location: Red Rose County
Contact:

Re: Bright orange rust on unknown plant

Post by Lancashire Lad » Wed Jul 01, 2015 8:10 pm

adampembs wrote:Thanks Mike :D
From what I'm reading, it looks like Triphragmium filipendulae is restricted to F. vulgaris, making this Triphragmium ulmariae . . .
Oooops!

Sorry Adam.
I hadn't spotted the comment in the Wilson & Henderson description, which does confirm that T.filipendulae, is found only on Filipendula
vulgaris
.
adampembs wrote: . . . I see no sign of spore ornamentation. I've looked at them in water, Melzers and L cotton blue and can see no see of being echinulate. Spores are 25-30 x 22-28µm. I suppose these are uredospores and perhaps only the teliaspores and aecidiospores are echinulate.
I think I can see the tell-tale signs of echinulation as out of focus points on the perimeter of the spores, especially in the last photo.

Anyhow, these have to be aecidiospores, as the uredosori look different, and it's too early in the year for them. ;)

From Wilson & Henderson: -
Uredosori hypophyllous, small, round, scattered, lemon yellow, very pulverulent, with peripheral paraphyses; uredospores globoid to obovoid, 20-30x18-25µ, wall pale yellow, sharply echinulate above, less so below, 1-1-5µ thick, pores obscure. . . . . On Filipendula ulmaria, aecidia, May- July; uredospores and teleutospores, August-November. Great Britain and Ireland, common.


Regards,
Mike.
Last edited by Lancashire Lad on Wed Jul 01, 2015 8:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Common sense is not so common.

User avatar
adampembs
Frequent user
Posts: 1540
Joined: Wed May 13, 2015 11:40 am
Location: Pembrokeshire
Contact:

Re: Bright orange rust on unknown plant

Post by adampembs » Thu Aug 27, 2015 9:11 pm

Chris Yeates wrote:Definitely F. ulmaria and therefore has to be Triphragmium ulmariae
Catch this later in the season and, a bit like with Trachyspora, the telia are less striking, but the teliospores are pretty cool - and rather give away the Tri-phragmium bit:

cheers
Chris
On cue, different site. Really interesting spores! and nice to see both stages on the same leaf :D
Attachments
P1110113.JPG
Triphragmium ulmariae
z_50.JPG
Triphragmium ulmariae teliospores and uredospores
z_51.JPG
Triphragmium ulmariae sori
Adam Pollard
Site admin

User avatar
Lancashire Lad
Frequent user
Posts: 885
Joined: Wed May 13, 2015 11:59 am
Location: Red Rose County
Contact:

Re: Bright orange rust on unknown plant

Post by Lancashire Lad » Fri Aug 28, 2015 1:56 pm

adampembs wrote:
Chris Yeates wrote:Definitely F. ulmaria and therefore has to be Triphragmium ulmariae
Catch this later in the season and, a bit like with Trachyspora, the telia are less striking, but the teliospores are pretty cool - and rather give away the Tri-phragmium bit:

cheers
Chris
On cue, different site. Really interesting spores! and nice to see both stages on the same leaf :D
Snap! :D

Found on Filipendula ulmaria growing in profusion on roadside verges. (Adjacent to Stocks Reservoir - Forest of Bowland).
Both Uredosori and Teliosori were found on the same individual leaves, but I chose to photograph the two stages of spore separately.
Triphragmium ulmariae uredospores x200.jpg (2) measured.jpg
Triphragmium ulmariae uredospores x200
Triphragmium ulmariae teliospores x200 measured.jpg
Triphragmium ulmariae teliospores x200
Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.

Post Reply