Myxo on dead Holly Leaf

Not technically fungi, but often lumped together with fungi
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Steve
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Myxo on dead Holly Leaf

Post by Steve » Mon May 01, 2017 9:47 am

Hi,
We found this on a dead Holly leaf in a Sheffield woodland. It's very small, with the "head" about 0.6-7 mm and stalk about 0.5 mm. Could anyone help at all with identification?
Cheers,
Steve
Attachments
1 Stereo.JPG
Stereo microscope image
2 Stereo x45.JPG
Stereo microscope image x45
3 Macro.jpg
Macro (stacked image)
4 Holly slime 600a.jpg
x600
5 Holly slime 600b.jpg
x600

Pitufo
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Re: Myxo on dead Holly Leaf

Post by Pitufo » Mon May 01, 2017 1:40 pm

Hi Steve

It could be Didymium squamulosum (but doesn't look quite right - the coating looks a but "fluffy").

Is the white coating on the outside made up of small star-shaped crystals or round-ish lumps?

Could you save a sample? I'd be happy to ID it for you.

Kind regards,

John

Steve
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Re: Myxo on dead Holly Leaf

Post by Steve » Mon May 01, 2017 3:45 pm

Hi John,
Yes I have the specimen and will be happy to send it to you - many thanks indeed,
I'll check out the limy coating.
Steve

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Re: Myxo on dead Holly Leaf

Post by Steve » Mon May 01, 2017 7:37 pm

Hi John,
Here is a bigger image of the myxo - it looks like a tiny Sparassis crispa.
Also some odd things from a squash of a whole FB - a setose struture and some radially-netted plates.
Cheers,
Steve
Attachments
stack x40 (C).jpg
x40 compound micro incident light
Squash x100.jpg
x100 squash
squash x600.jpg
x600 squash
x600a.jpg
x600 squash

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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Myxo on dead Holly Leaf

Post by Lancashire Lad » Mon May 01, 2017 10:04 pm

Hi Steve,

I can't add anything useful regards the myxo, but did you notice the even tinier sea urchin-like spiny black coelomycetes, also on the leaf?

A couple are in good view just behind the single specimen "insert" on your macro-stacked image. - Third image in original post.

(Also the likely origin of the "setose structure" you mention in the second image "x100 squash" of your post immediately above, rather than being part of the myxo sporangia).

Unless I'm very much mistaken, those will be Pyrenochaeta ilicis.

e.g.: -
Pyrenochaeta ilicis.jpg
Pyrenochaeta ilicis on dead Holly leaf.
Pyrenochaeta ilicis02.jpg
Pyrenochaeta ilicis on dead Holly leaf.
Regards,
Mike.

PS: If you haven't already got the books, W.B. Grove's "British Stem & Leaf Fungi (Coelomycetes)", volumes 1 & 2 can be downloaded as PDF's (both about 35Mb file-size) from the Internet Archive site - here: -
Volume 1: - https://ia601601.us.archive.org/25/item ... h-Stem.pdf
Volume 2: - https://ia801605.us.archive.org/6/items ... h-Stem.pdf

(See page 152 in volume 1 for Pyrenochaeta ilicis).
(See also: - Page 148, and illustration No.648, in Ellis & Ellis).
Common sense is not so common.

Steve
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Re: Myxo on dead Holly Leaf

Post by Steve » Tue May 02, 2017 8:07 am

That is amazing!
Never seen that spidery one before - many thanks.
Always something new in field mycology :D
Cheers,
Steve

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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Myxo on dead Holly Leaf

Post by Lancashire Lad » Tue May 02, 2017 1:34 pm

Hi again Steve,

I didn't mention this previously because I thought I couldn't really add anything constructive to what John (Pitufo) had said about the myxo.
However, thinking about it some more, it may just be of some relevance - and may be of some small help to John when he examines your find.

The dead Holly leaves upon which I found the Pyrenochaeta ilicis also had a myxo on them which looked superficially like yours.
(Unsurprisingly, it was the myxo that I saw first - I only spotted the tiny Pyrenochaeta later on when I had the leaves under the stereo scope).

I determined that myxo to be a Didymium, (and suspected squamulosum as the likeliest species candidate).

However, at about that same time, I discovered that prof. Bruce Ing had determined a separate species of Didymium, which grew only on Holly leaf litter, (and, apparently, living Lime bark), which he'd named as Didymium ilicium.
Unfortunately, at that time, there wasn't any information readily available that would have helped me in deciding what I'd got. (And even now, there seems to be precious little information available on D.ilicium).

Cutting a long story short, professor Ing kindly examined my find, which was eventually determined as a slightly atypical example of plain old D.squamulosum. :D ;)

Professor Ing's book "The Slime Moulds of Cheshire" includes a short reference to D.ilicium. - Unfortunately no mention of spore or peridial crystal sizes etc. etc., but it does state that the characteristic differentiating that species from the D.squamulosum complex is "the intricately ridged and flaky deposits on the sporangium wall".
see: -
Didymium ilicinum.JPG
D.ilicinum info from "Slime Moulds of Cheshire".
Looking again at the third photo in your original post - I'd certainly say that your example seems to have "intricately ridged" and "flaky looking" deposits on the peridium wall - so just maybe - you might have D.ilicium there?

I've added a few photos of my D.squamulosum find below, which may be of some use in comparing with yours. (Note the stellate peridial calcium/lime crystals amongst the spores).

Regards,
Mike.
Attachments
02 - Didymium.jpg
Didymium on Holly leaf.
04 - Didymium 230312 x600 Measured Spores.jpg
Didymium spores x600
05-  Didymium elators  x200.jpg
Didymium elators x200
07 - Didymium elators x200.jpg
Didymium elators x200
08 - Didymium Peridium x200.jpg
Didymium peridium x200
Common sense is not so common.

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Chris Yeates
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Re: Myxo on dead Holly Leaf

Post by Chris Yeates » Sat May 06, 2017 1:38 am

Lancashire Lad wrote:
Mon May 01, 2017 10:04 pm
Unless I'm very much mistaken, those will be Pyrenochaeta ilicis.
You are not very much mistaken . . .
Chris
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

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Re: Myxo on dead Holly Leaf

Post by Pitufo » Fri May 12, 2017 9:04 pm

Thanks Steve for the very interesting sample. Also Mike for the discussion and photos.

Please see attached a cross-eyed stereo pair showing the distinct peridial covering.

My thoughts are that it is a variant of Didymium squamulosum - the main reason being the spores are not distinct enough to separate it. Similar variants have been described previously (the earliest goes back to var ilicis by Lister).

Ing has described a new species, Didymium ilicinum, with distinct characteristics
1) wrinkled crust made up of flakes, not stellate crystals
2) spores evenly and strongly spinulose, the arrangement of spinules more or less reticulate
3) pale smooth capillitium (without inclusions)

The spores in this specimen are not distinct enough and are unevenly spinulose - I couldn't differeniate from those of D.squamulosum. The capillitium was also not distinct.

A great collection though Steve and one I will add to the reference library. Any more myxos would be welcome.
Attachments
Didymium172.pixi.jpeg
Spores - Didymium specimen from Steve
Didymium173.pixi.jpg
Spores for comparison - Didymium squamulosum
Didymium-squamulosum_var_ilicis_1000.jpg
Didymium squamulosum (var ilicis? from Steve)
DsquamulosumVariliicisStereopair2000.jpg
Cross-eyed stereo pair. Didymium squamulosum (var ilicis? from Steve)

Steve
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Re: Myxo on dead Holly Leaf

Post by Steve » Tue May 16, 2017 11:30 am

Many thanks indeed John, Chris and Mike,
An example of fantastic pooling of chance find, knowledge, experience and altruism on UK Fungi! Better together!
Steve

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