Synnematous fungus - new species? (STILBACEAE)

MaxRum
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Synnematous fungus - new species? (STILBACEAE)

Post by MaxRum » Tue Nov 08, 2016 4:02 am

Dear friends,

I am attempting to identify a mushroom which must by something very unusual, rare or perhaps something new since no identity could be reached after consulting another two fora. Trying my luck with UK perhaps there are someone familiar with it or perhaps lead me to contact some expert.


Tiny fungus found on decaying bark, about 0.5-1.0mm long with a yellowish-tobacco 'stipe' (which I believe it is a coremia), quite tough and sometimes developing a black sheath at the base, supporting a sporocarp which is irregularly round or ovate, covered in a greyish olive-green mass of spores. This is also quite tough and a cross section reveals a pale medulla and a dark green cortex (reproductive layer).

Under the microscope, I interpreted the fungus is composed of a densely packed layer of penicillate structures composed of a series of x4-x6 divaricating branches until finally they end with a 15-18um philaide producing one lachrymoid spore (5-6um long). The philaide have slightly pigmented wall, and an acute apex. Phialides and underlying branching elements with longitudinally irregular/sinuated/crooked margins.

Spores not produced in chains, polyblastic.

IN KOH the sporocarp becomes black-dark green

I am convinced that it is a STILBACEAE family (care this name is also given to a family angiosperms) or maybe Tuberculariaceae
Attachments
IMG_2767.jpg
Gregarious specimens on decaying bark fallen on ground
IMG_2773.jpg
Fruiting head pastel green which turns balck in KOH
IMG_2775.jpg
IMG_2780.jpg
Squashed specimen under low magn.
IMG_2800.jpg
This is about 0.6mm long
IMG_2805.jpg
Cross section

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Ganoderma resinaceum
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Re: Synnematous fungus - new species? (STILBACEAE)

Post by Ganoderma resinaceum » Tue Nov 08, 2016 4:25 pm

If you have samples, it might be wise to contact Kew Gardens' mycology section and discuss it with them / send them samples. Good luck!

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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Synnematous fungus - new species? (STILBACEAE)

Post by Lancashire Lad » Tue Nov 08, 2016 5:08 pm

Hi and welcome to UK Fungi.

You mention trying elsewhere without success, and now trying UK

Do you mean that these were found outside of the UK? - or that you are now trying here at UK Fungi?

If found outside of the UK, it would be a good idea to say exactly where in the world they were found.

Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.

MaxRum
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Re: Synnematous fungus - new species? (STILBACEAE)

Post by MaxRum » Tue Nov 08, 2016 6:16 pm

Dear all,

Sorry for the incomplete data re my Demetiaous fungus. First of all, I have posted this on ascofrance.fr and the link is here:
http://www.ascofrance.fr/forum?page=1&id=45593

I am a Maltese botanist and I am entering in the world of Mycology... macrofungi are interesting but I find most challenging and interesting the microfungi and myxomycetes. This particular species was found on decaying branchlet lying on a humid, shaded but not wet ground under a canopy of olives.

I wanted to share other photos so here are some more.
Attachments
IMG_2842.JPG
Fruiting bodies become blackish-green in KOH
IMG_7027s.JPG
This is interesting: are those feathery fungi the same species but turned vegetative. The stipe has the same colour and morphology. (see image 7059)
IMG_7037.jpg
Close up of the fruiting bodies
IMG_7059.jpg
Is the image showing the sexual (with blue conidial heads) and asexual (feathery sterile mycelia) forms of the same species, or they are two different species?
IMG_7120ss.jpg
Micro (sorry for lack of contrast) but is consists of a x5-x6 series of divaricate-branching and a 'philaide' at the end.
U028-Illustration.jpg
Illustration of how I am interpreting the morphology of this fungus

MaxRum
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Re: Synnematous fungus - new species? (STILBACEAE)

Post by MaxRum » Tue Nov 08, 2016 6:20 pm

Some more photos....

So I was tipped that since the conidiophore has wall thickenings = pigmented... it should fall within the order of Demetiales and forget Moniales.
Attachments
IMG_7052s.JPG
IMG_2813.jpg
IMG_2822.jpg
IMG_2829.jpg
IMG_2831.jpg

MaxRum
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Re: Synnematous fungus - new species? (STILBACEAE)

Post by MaxRum » Wed Nov 09, 2016 5:29 pm

Ganoderma resinaceum wrote:If you have samples, it might be wise to contact Kew Gardens' mycology section and discuss it with them / send them samples. Good luck!
Hi, I think this fungus is also obscure to UK mycologists, students and amateurs. Do you have a direct link or contact person's email for kew Gardens because prior sending some sample i wish to speak and inform the mycologist in charge. Does storing some specimen in 95% ethonal help and is a good idea to preserve the morphology?

Many thanks

MaxRum
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Re: Synnematous fungus - new species? (STILBACEAE)

Post by MaxRum » Wed Nov 09, 2016 5:30 pm

Sorry - it wasn't difficult to find the contacts afterall. Posting the link for others who have the same query.

http://www.kew.org/science/mycolstaff.html

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Re: Synnematous fungus - new species? (STILBACEAE)

Post by Chris Yeates » Fri Nov 11, 2016 12:20 am

MaxRum wrote:
Ganoderma resinaceum wrote:If you have samples, it might be wise to contact Kew Gardens' mycology section and discuss it with them / send them samples. Good luck!
Hi, I think this fungus is also obscure to UK mycologists, students and amateurs. Do you have a direct link or contact person's email for kew Gardens because prior sending some sample i wish to speak and inform the mycologist in charge. Does storing some specimen in 95% ethonal help and is a good idea to preserve the morphology?

Many thanks
Hello
with an anamorphic fungus like this ones hopes of an identification should generally be pessimistic. I don't think that the mycologists at Kew would feel themselves able to comment; in the days of the Commonwealth/International Mycological Institute things might have been different, but mycological taxonomy in the UK has (sadly) shrunk since those days.
The fungus would have to be cultured and then sequenced; storing it in ethanol - and thereby killing it - would render it useless for both those purposes. I doubt that it is new, there are probably sequences waiting at institutions like https://www.knaw.nl/en/institutes/cbs or indeed fungi waiting to be sequenced there which might place your fungus somewhere in the picture.
Not a happy state of affairs, but a realistic one. If no-one at ASCOFrance was prepared to offer help then, I am afraid, we in the UK are not the answer . . .
Chris

PS if it is any consolation, then I, with my interest in micro-fungi, regularly find what appear to be interesting / identifiable anamorphic fungi; in general they are (regretfully) consigned to the bin . . .
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

MaxRum
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Re: Synnematous fungus - new species? (STILBACEAE)

Post by MaxRum » Fri Nov 11, 2016 3:25 pm

Indeed not even an acknowledgement from Kew, and perhaps the reason is within your message.

Could you suggest few places (institutions, laboratories, research centres) where for this or in the future i can submit specimens for sequencing and get ID by a genetic approach, apart the one from NL ? Usually do they ask for money and how much (very roughly ?)

I shall be contacting NL, but the remaining specimen is not very good I am afraid.

I got some help and literature from ASCO.fr. Would be great in this forum to open a section with stored literature, monographs, papers, articles, ebooks, sorted according the fungal classification to serve as a online and easy-access library of docs/literature.


Thanks

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Chris Yeates
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Re: Synnematous fungus - new species? (STILBACEAE)

Post by Chris Yeates » Fri Nov 11, 2016 5:55 pm

MaxRum wrote:. . . . . Would be great in this forum to open a section with stored literature, monographs, papers, articles, ebooks, sorted according the fungal classification to serve as a online and easy-access library of docs/literature.
Thanks
At least this is a start . . . viewtopic.php?f=3&t=156
Chris
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

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