One to look out for

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Chris Johnson
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Re: One to look out for

Post by Chris Johnson » Fri Feb 15, 2019 5:50 pm

Chris Yeates wrote:
Fri Feb 15, 2019 4:06 pm
Chris Johnson wrote:
Fri Feb 15, 2019 2:57 pm
Now much farther north ... on the first leaf I picked up :shock:
Thanks for bringing this to our attention.
Chris
Excellent! Farther north - but climate largely ameliorated by Gulf Stream? Could I have the grid ref.? I'll add it to the map . . .
regards
Chris
Balivanich - NF778552

Cheers, Chris

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Chris Yeates
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Re: One to look out for

Post by Chris Yeates » Fri Feb 15, 2019 7:03 pm

Latest map:
Physalacria stilboidea.jpg
Chris
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

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Re: One to look out for

Post by Chris Yeates » Fri Feb 15, 2019 10:22 pm

Hi Jerry Cooper has just drawn my attention to this overview of New Zealand Physalacriaceae: https://www.funnz.org.nz/sites/default/ ... ceae_1.pdf
Although it deals with a mycota literally a world away it still makes interesting reading and much is relevant to GB & I. Note the opening paragraph and the comment about some "Marasmius" spp. belonging in Physalacriaceae (i.e. placed in Gloiocephala) - an obvious candidate would be:
Marasmius epiphylloides 0a.jpg
note those pileocystidia at the bottom.
Chris
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

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Re: One to look out for

Post by Chris Johnson » Sat Feb 16, 2019 8:28 am

Interesting reading: sequencing has produced some unlikely associations. Makes life challenging for the amateur.

Regards, Chris

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Re: One to look out for

Post by Fay Newbery » Sat Feb 16, 2019 11:32 am

Chris Johnson wrote:
Fri Feb 15, 2019 2:57 pm
Now much farther north ... on the first leaf I picked up :shock:

Thanks for bringing this to our attention.

Chris
It took me over 30 leaves!! Your leaf looks brown. Was it still slightly leathery as if it hadn't been fallen for very long?

Fay

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Re: One to look out for

Post by Chris Johnson » Sat Feb 16, 2019 12:26 pm

Fay Newbery wrote:
Sat Feb 16, 2019 11:32 am
Chris Johnson wrote:
Fri Feb 15, 2019 2:57 pm
Now much farther north ... on the first leaf I picked up :shock:

Thanks for bringing this to our attention.

Chris
It took me over 30 leaves!! Your leaf looks brown. Was it still slightly leathery as if it hadn't been fallen for very long?

Fay
Yes, just as you describe. I looked at about 40 'promising' (right age) leaves and found four with the fungus.

Chris

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Re: One to look out for

Post by Chris Yeates » Sat Feb 16, 2019 5:05 pm

In New Zealand, JAC informs me Griselinia is not particularly coastal, it is also the less common genus for the Physalacria.
https://avh.ala.org.au/occurrences/sear ... ab_mapView
The commoner hosts are Pseudopanax crassifolius & Ps. arboreus:
https://avh.ala.org.au/occurrences/sear ... ab_mapView
https://avh.ala.org.au/occurrences/sear ... ab_mapView

Pseudopanax is a member of the ivy family, Araliaceae. It has an interesting growth form, starting with the lower leaves being strap-like and armed with vicious teeth.
http://www.terrain.net.nz/friends-of-te ... ewood.html
When the tree gets to a certain height the leaf form changes; the reason for this was an adaptation to discourage browsing by Moas https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moa (no large native terrestrial mammals in NZ remember).

Pseudopanax crassifolius is grown in this country: https://www.burncoose.co.uk/site/plants.cfm?pl_id=3487 though much less commonly than Griselinia. If the fungus only occurs on the older, broader leaves, then the plant would have to be fairly old and have survived quite a number of winters - so a bit of a challenge to find the fungus on that. I would suspect that keeping ones eyes open in Southern botanical gardens and arboreta is the best bet - especially some of those splendid ones in Cornwall.

I used to work in museums so am hard-wired to love how these stories can spiral out and inter-connect. Interesting winter study - plus the bonus of a fungus which can be found at this time of year. (Come on Mike! this must be around in coastal Lancashire . . . .)

Chris
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

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Re: One to look out for

Post by hcochard2 » Sun Mar 03, 2019 7:44 pm

Hi there,
just to let you guys know that we have recently identified this species in France. Found in January 2019, in Bretagne, growing on Griselinia leaves. We think it is the first french record of this species.
The specimens are being sequenced. I've asked just Jerry Cooper to share his sequences with we to see if they match well.
Here is a picture of our collection.
All the best,
Hervé
http://herve.cochard.free.fr
Physalacria stilboidea 1.jpg

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Re: One to look out for

Post by Chris Yeates » Mon Mar 04, 2019 1:21 am

Bonsoir Hervé
Magnifique! Je pense qu'il ne fait aucun doute que vous avez trouvé cette espèce.

Amitiés
Chris
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

gary
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Re: One to look out for

Post by gary » Mon Mar 04, 2019 8:42 am

Is it everywhere where there is Griselinia? but no-one has looked for it before.
The lesson to be learned is that when you import exotic plants into the UK then you don't really know what else comes in with them and what effects they might have everything else.
Having said that I think this fungus is specific to these plants with leaves that are like leather and presumably difficult to decompose.

Brilliant picture

Gary

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Re: One to look out for

Post by Chris Yeates » Mon Mar 04, 2019 10:09 pm

gary wrote:
Mon Mar 04, 2019 8:42 am
Is it everywhere where there is Griselinia? but no-one has looked for it before.
As I said in a previous post:
It would be interesting to know how the fungus spreads, I would suspect that it survives as an endophyte. From the RHS website it would appear that Griselinia littoralis is propagated by semi-hardwood cuttings, so the fungus could well be moving around with the plants and we are dealing with a series of cloned populations."
gary wrote:
Mon Mar 04, 2019 8:42 am
The lesson to be learned is that when you import exotic plants into the UK then you don't really know what else comes in with them and what effects they might have everything else. . . .
Of course New Zealand, the natural home of Griselinia, is extremely hot on biosecurity. It's very tempting to wonder (at the danger of getting a wee bit political) what the effect of Brexit and an increasing desperation to do deals with all and sundry across the globe - at whatever cost - may have.

Chris
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

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Re: One to look out for

Post by Chris Yeates » Wed May 01, 2019 4:38 pm

I have been in touch again with Martyn Ainsworth at Kew. He has kindly given me the accurate grid reference for the Anglesey record, plus a couple of new records of his. He agrees that the fungus is probably an endophyte.
Here is the amended map - I've made the dots a bit bigger for ease of use.
Chris
Physalacria stilboidea.jpg
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

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