Looking at a Jelly Spot

Discussion about cameras, microscopes, stains, and gadgets, along with useful tips for preparation of fungi samples
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Steve
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Posts: 442
Joined: Sun May 17, 2015 8:59 pm
Location: Sheffield, Yorkshire

Looking at a Jelly Spot

Post by Steve » Mon Jul 11, 2016 3:25 pm

I picked up this Dacrymyces on the way to the shops – it had fallen from one of Sheffield’s huge streetside lime trees. From the jizz of the 5mm fruitbodies– and the spores up to 17 x 6, it looked like Dacrymyces stillatus. But there are, from the FRDBI records, apparently about a dozen and a half species of Dacrymyces, and around Sheffield they almost all get called D. stillatus. I was a bit perplexed by the abundant conidia-like sub-spherical-oval bodies , up to 2 um long. These are illustrated in Fungi of Switzerland Vol. 2 for D, capitata, but are larger (about 5 um). The basidiospores and basidia of that species also differ in size from D. stillatus.
I had a good look at the spores in a variety of stains, as the septa aren’t very clear in a water mount.
Red food dye was as good as anything!
Cutting a section was not easy with such jelly-like fungi, so I tried Fungi John’s technique of freezing the fruitbodies and then slicing with a razor blade. This worked fine. I was able to easily make micrographs of the basidia and the hyphae.
The hyphae were smooth, 2-3 wide, without clamps. Basidia were about 50 long. This seems to fit D. stillatus. Presumably the conidia are just not mentioned in the description. If that's what they are - some stains picked them up, some didn't.
Steve
1 Macro and spore print.jpg
Macro, stereo microscope images, and yellow spore print
1 Water.jpg
Spores in water x 600
2 Congo red and Food dye.jpg
Congo Red (ammoniacal) and red food dye
3 Cotton Blue Lacto and Cresyl Blue.jpg
Cotton Blue (Lactophenol) and Cresyl Blue
4 Methylene Blue and Fast Green.jpg
Methylene Blue and Fast Green
5 Melzer's and Nigrosin.jpg
Melzer's and Nigrosin

Steve
Frequent user
Posts: 442
Joined: Sun May 17, 2015 8:59 pm
Location: Sheffield, Yorkshire

Re: Looking at a Jelly Spot

Post by Steve » Mon Jul 11, 2016 3:32 pm

Here is how I got on with the frozen sectioning.
Steve
1 Macro.JPG
Frozen specimen in layer of ice
2 frozen sect 200 congo.jpg
Section x 200 in Congo Red (ammoniacal)
3 Hymenium2016-07-11 11-43-04 (C).jpg
Hymenial surface x 600 - stacked image. In Congo Red (ammoniacal)
4 600 squash.jpg
Squash x 600. In Congo Red (ammoniacal)
5 oil.jpg
Basidium with spore x 1000. In Congo red (ammoniacal)
6 frozen hyphae 600 cr.jpg
Hyphae x 600. In Congo red (ammoniacal)

Pitufo
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Joined: Thu May 21, 2015 10:18 am

Re: Looking at a Jelly Spot

Post by Pitufo » Mon Jul 11, 2016 8:54 pm

Very interesting - I picked some similar lemon jelly today (although a bit bigger).

I have always struggled to get a decent section - I will try freezing one. Thanks.

Steve
Frequent user
Posts: 442
Joined: Sun May 17, 2015 8:59 pm
Location: Sheffield, Yorkshire

Re: Looking at a Jelly Spot

Post by Steve » Tue Jul 12, 2016 10:55 am

I too struggled up till yesterday. Make sure it's in a block of ice because you don't have long before the jelly fungus thaws!
And use a new razor blade too :x
Steve

Pitufo
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Joined: Thu May 21, 2015 10:18 am

Re: Looking at a Jelly Spot

Post by Pitufo » Tue Jul 12, 2016 3:23 pm

Thanks Steve .. I suspect that putting logs in the freezer is not going to increase my popularity at home ;)

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