Lactarius?

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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jimmymac2
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Lactarius?

Post by jimmymac2 » Sat Sep 05, 2015 8:17 am

I know these are tricky but I'm hoping asking for an identification will help me get to know the genus.
This was found on the back lawn, a few metres from the back door. It exudes a white liquid from the gills and a bit from the cap. Nothing from the stem. No large trees withing 7-10 metres but the closest is a Goat Willow and a huge Oak. Spore spines are 1.1 - 1.3 µm.
DSCN8309.jpg
Cap
DSCN8311.jpg
Gills, with white juice.
Site001 - Lactarius sp. 1 - Spores001 - Measured.jpg
Site001 - Lactarius sp. 1 - Spores001 - Unmeasured.jpg
Site001 - Lactarius sp. 1 - Spores002.jpg
Always keep your eyes open... :shock:

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Re: Lactarius?

Post by adampembs » Sat Sep 05, 2015 8:29 am

Hi Jimmy

There is a free Lactarius key here
http://www.britmycolsoc.org.uk/files/71 ... eonard.pdf

The starting characters to check are the colour of the milk on drying, and the taste of the milk. This is definitely a Lactarius, and there are no deadly poisonous species in this genus. Smell is also important.
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Re: Lactarius?

Post by Lancashire Lad » Sat Sep 05, 2015 9:54 am

Hi Jimmy,

Looks interesting.

There are not too many Lactarius with that sort of cap colouration.

Looking in the book "The Genus Lactarius" (Clausen/Verbeken/Vesterholt - 1998), one that looks pretty similar macroscopically is Lactarius subumbonatus.

It often has a small ill-defined umbo, but also does frequently appear without the umbo - so, the fact that your find doesn't have one wouldn't necessarily discount it.

Acccording to the description, it favours Quercus (Oak) - so that fits with your nearest trees,
It has "watery" milk - which appears to suit the watery look of the milk in your photo. (Taste of milk is stated as "mild").
The gills are said to be broadly adnate to slightly decurrent, which also fits with your specimen.
The taste of the flesh is said to be "mild, like hazelnuts, soon +/- nauseous, and sometimes slightly acrid".
The smell (general) is stated as"very strong and sweetish - like bugs" :shock:

Spore range is 6.3-8.6 x 5.6-7.8µ, so that fits nicely with the measurements you show.
Spores are said to have a rather course +/- complete reticulum - which again seems to fit well with what you show.

I have to admit, that Lactarius subumbonatus is a species that I am not personally familiar with, but it seems to be fairly common in Britain, as there are 412 records for it on the FRDBI.

I am certainly not 100% confident that that is what you've got - but I think it looks to be a reasonable contender.
To be certain one way or the other, you would need to check several microscopic characteristics - which might prove a bit daunting without experience: -
i.e.: - "Spore ornamentation +/- inamyloid, Basidia 35-60 x8.5-11.5µ, mostly sub-clavate, 2 or 4 spored. Without pleuromacrocystidia. Gill edge heterogenous or sterile; paracystidia 15-40 x 6.5-12 (16)µ, cylindric to clavate, obovoid or capitate av. Q > 2.5. Pileipellis a hypoepithelium; elements in subpellis 7.5-25µ broad, elongate to +/- isodiametric, rounded; terminal elemenmts 3.5-10µ broad, +/- cylindric, forming a conspicuous layer above the subpellis, but often collapsed to form an amorphous layer".

Looking at the above, you might get some idea why trying to confidently identify things - even when you have the fungi in front of you, let alone just from photos and other peoples descriptions, can often be difficult. :D

Regards,
Mike.
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Re: Lactarius?

Post by jimmymac2 » Sat Sep 05, 2015 10:23 am

Thanks Mike. Looking at the list of what I need to do microscopically, I don't think I'll even try at the moment! It all looks very complicated and I think I'll leave that until I have way more experience; hopefully the fungus is still there in 10 years time!
The milk did have a mild taste, and the first thing I noted with the smell is that it was like pineapple - therefore "sweetish"!
Thanks for your effort and I do appreciate that it is very tricky to identify one of my fungi from your laptop!
Always keep your eyes open... :shock:

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Re: Lactarius?

Post by adampembs » Sat Sep 05, 2015 11:03 am

Did you download or look at the key I linked? It has a lot of useful information, and some Lactarius are easier than others.
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Re: Lactarius?

Post by jimmymac2 » Sat Sep 05, 2015 11:08 am

I have looked at the key and I am currently working through it. I am waiting for the milk to dry this very minute!
Always keep your eyes open... :shock:

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Re: Lactarius?

Post by Ken Burgess » Sat Sep 05, 2015 11:16 am

There are not many options for Lactarius when you have a cap as dark as this, which helps considerably.

If the milk is white (watery) and unchanging that narrows it down even further.

For me, your specimen has all the characters of Lactarius subumbonatus (with a very dark brown cap), but this is now synonymised by many authors with Lactarius serifluus, encompassing a range of cap colours varying from reddish brown to dark brown. The crenulate cap margin visible in your photos is also characteristic.

The smell is usually distinctive - a bit like Lactarius quietus but also described as sweetish.

Ken

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