Ear like Fungi ID please

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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Please do not ask for the identification of fungi for edibility or narcotic purposes. Any help provided by forum members is on the understanding that fungi are not to be consumed. Any deaths or serious poisonings are the responsibility of the person eating or preparing the fungus for others. If it is apparent from a post that the fungus is for eating or smoking etc, the post will be deleted and a warning given. Although many members do eat fungi, no-one would be willing to take someone else's life into their hands.
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NellyDee
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Ear like Fungi ID please

Post by NellyDee » Thu Sep 03, 2015 1:47 pm

There are a few clusters of these on a track through beech trees. the ground is peat/rock far amount of moss. they have a rubbery feel but break very easily, so brittle and no particular smell.
IMG_5498.JPG

Leif
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Re: Ear like Fungi ID please

Post by Leif » Thu Sep 03, 2015 2:07 pm

Hello NellyDee

That is an Otidea species, which typically look like cups but split vertically on one side, if that makes sense. There are three likely UK species: O. bufonia, O. alutacea and O. cochleata. I rule out the first as your specimens are rather pale. To separate the next two requires microscopy. I suspect it is Otidea alutacea, based on the shape and pale colour, but I am guessing, and I could well be mistaken. If not, then it is O. cochleata.

Otidea species are often listed as uncommon or rare, but I find them to be one of the commonest of cup fungi, and in my experience O. bufonia is more common than Peziza badia. But that might be due to the areas where I collect, rather than a general thing. Still, it is a nice find.

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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Ear like Fungi ID please

Post by Lancashire Lad » Thu Sep 03, 2015 3:11 pm

I agree with Leif.

I don't find much Otidea cochleata, but I do find lots of Otidea alutacea in my local woodland and your photo definitely has the right sort of "macro" looks.

It is my experience too, that O.alutacea is much more common (locally) than any other species of cup fungi.
(With the possible exception of Tarzetta cupularis - which sometimes fruits in enormous numbers by the path edge of another local woodland).

Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.

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NellyDee
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Re: Ear like Fungi ID please

Post by NellyDee » Fri Sep 04, 2015 9:02 am

Thank you Leif and Mike for the info and ID, very grateful. I have only been collecting information and IDs on the fungi that grows on 'my patch' which over the years you and others have IDd in WAB days. I think, due to our wet Spring and Summer, that I am not seeing the usual fungi and most that have appeared so far are ones I have not seen before. This is probably a really silly question but does the mycelium for these just lay dormant. beneath the mycelium of the fungi that usually appears, or have the spores just blown in.

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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Ear like Fungi ID please

Post by Lancashire Lad » Fri Sep 04, 2015 10:04 am

NellyDee wrote: . . . . does the mycelium for these just lay dormant. beneath the mycelium of the fungi that usually appears, or have the spores just blown in.
Hi Nelly,

I'm not sure how long (months/years?) it would take before, (when a spore germinates), enough mycelia would have grown that fruitbodies would start to appear. (Probably varies widely from species to species, and on the particular location/habitat).

I do know that some fungi tend to "fruit" intermittently with a potential for not fruiting at all for several years. So, the fungus might have been present unnoticed at that spot for quite some considerable time.

Otidea alutacea appear regularly at the same spot in a local woodland that I regularly visit. Some years they are all over the area, some years there are few to be seen.
I'd be surprised if, now that you've spotted them, you don't find them again at that same spot in years to come.

Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.

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NellyDee
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Re: Ear like Fungi ID please

Post by NellyDee » Fri Sep 04, 2015 12:01 pm

Thank you Mike I will keep my eyes open.

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