Common Earthball?

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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jimmymac2
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Common Earthball?

Post by jimmymac2 » Sun Aug 30, 2015 4:34 pm

Not certain on what to do microscopically with Earth and Puffballs, I stuck a needle in the fruit body and I was surprised to find immature spores when I looked under the microscope, measuring 2.362µm x 2.423µm on average (rounded up) and with numerous narrow, long spines. Found growing out of someone's lawn on a walk round the neighbourhood, which was crammed with fungi after I came back from a 2 week holiday to Canada.
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Always keep your eyes open... :shock:

roy betts
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Re: Common Earthball?

Post by roy betts » Mon Aug 31, 2015 11:00 am

There's something amiss with your spore dimensions: Scleroderma spores should be in the range 9-15µ. All species have warty or spiney spores.
The thick skin (peridium) suggests the Common Earth Ball but "numerous narrow, long spines" points towards areolatum or verrucosum.
It is important to check the attachment to the soil (yours is broken off). Verrucosum is larger than areolatum and has a thick rooting pseudostipe. It could also be S. bovista which has a mesh-like reticulate pattern on the spores.

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jimmymac2
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Re: Common Earthball?

Post by jimmymac2 » Mon Aug 31, 2015 11:06 am

There's something amiss with your spore dimensions: Scleroderma spores should be in the range 9-15µ.
I think they were immature spores, the fruiting body hasn't yet ruptured for the spores to be dispersed. Would that explain the small size?
Always keep your eyes open... :shock:

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Re: Common Earthball?

Post by adampembs » Mon Aug 31, 2015 11:16 am

jimmymac2 wrote:
There's something amiss with your spore dimensions: Scleroderma spores should be in the range 9-15µ.
I think they were immature spores, the fruiting body hasn't yet ruptured for the spores to be dispersed. Would that explain the small size?
Recheck and measure your calibration slides.
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roy betts
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Re: Common Earthball?

Post by roy betts » Mon Aug 31, 2015 11:26 am

Immature spores might be 7 or 8µ diameter I guess, but not down to 2.5µ.

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Chris Yeates
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Re: Common Earthball?

Post by Chris Yeates » Mon Aug 31, 2015 11:30 am

jimmymac2 wrote:. . . measuring 2.362µm x 2.423µm on average (rounded up) . . .
Very confusing :? measuring to a millionth of a millimetre (and that "rounded up")
:D
(don't worry I've done many crazier things :oops: )
Chris
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Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

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