Unidentified Fungus in Mixed Woodland

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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Bob Hazell
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Unidentified Fungus in Mixed Woodland

Post by Bob Hazell » Sat Jul 27, 2019 12:13 pm

I photographed this fungus yesterday at Draycote Water, Rugby. It was in an area of mixed woodland and appeared to be growing in rotting twigs. The cap appeared very irregular, even pitted and velvety and it was not clear to me whether this was a single fungus or more than one fused together. The cap or caps was about 5cms across. The underside of the cap and stipe appeared very similar and almost merged. I would be grateful on any thoughts as to identity - have been "toying" with a form of Hedgehog fungus?
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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Unidentified Fungus in Mixed Woodland

Post by Lancashire Lad » Sat Jul 27, 2019 12:53 pm

Hi Bob,

For Hedgehog Fungus, (Hydnum repandum or Hydnum rufescens for example), the "spines" would be much more regular, and readily identifiable as individual spines.

I think your find looks like a fairly young example of Abortiporus biennis - Blushing Rosette.

Not yet fully mature, so not showing some macro characteristics that might be expected.

However, it does generally grow on buried wood, and growing around blades of grass etc., (examples of which are seen in your photo), is fairly typical of that species.

Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.

Bob Hazell
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Posts: 120
Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2016 12:41 pm

Re: Unidentified Fungus in Mixed Woodland

Post by Bob Hazell » Sat Jul 27, 2019 1:06 pm

Thanks Mike. As always, much appreciated.
Regards,
Bob

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