Found within coniferous plantation

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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Huma
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Found within coniferous plantation

Post by Huma » Fri Nov 23, 2018 6:36 pm

As a newbie I thought that field guides alone would get me by for IDing. I know realise that this is not the case and that spore prints are essential. I have flicked through the Collins Guide, Phillips and Jordan and I am still not able to ID the following. All found in a coniferous plantation, not grouped or tufted and all with caps about 0.5-1.5cm, stem 3cms. Advice would be greatly appreciated. There are two species attached (1 and 2, 3 and 4). Thank you. Hugh
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mollisia
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Re: Found within coniferous plantation

Post by mollisia » Fri Nov 23, 2018 8:16 pm

Hello,

there are fungi or even genera/groups within the fungi that are quite easy to ID with the usual field books, and others are not. So in your case you had some "bad luck" that you came across two species belonging to the last group ....

The first is Clitocybe species, and I wouldn't be astonished if it smelled like aniseed or similar. Clitocybe fragrans s.l. in that case. If not, some other CLitocybe species.

The second is more easy, but you got it in a quite dried up state and therefore not typical. It is Rhodocollybia (butyracea var.) asema (or Collybia butyracea var. asema in older books). I find the species more easy to recognize by the stipe characters than by the cap characters.

best regards,
Andreas

Huma
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Location: Leamington Spa

Re: Found within coniferous plantation

Post by Huma » Fri Nov 23, 2018 11:30 pm

Dear Andreas, Thank you very much for your encouraging reply and help. I have spent many hours sifting through my field guides without success on this occasion and it is pleasing to know that the two species were of the kind that are "hard" to identify (with my limited experience). Your advice is much appreciated. Good wishes, Hugh

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