Identification please?

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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brandy piece
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Identification please?

Post by brandy piece » Sun Nov 04, 2018 9:00 am

This crop of single mushrooms appeared a couple of weeks ago on my front lawn beneath a red robin tree. They have since gone.
mushroom 1.jpg
mushroom 2.jpg
Having been initially thrown by the colour, when viewing the crop from above, I now feel 80% sure what they are. But want an expert view!

The caps were a light yellow/brown colour, darker in the middle and almost white at the margin. None were pale green. A close view shows some streaky radiating lines that are more conspicuous at the margin.

Gills are white. The picked one has a ring but I couldn't see a volva at the bases of these - I didn't look too hard though, and they could have been buried or partially buried in the soil. A recent look at their last remains suggests there may have been a thickening at the base.

I am only interested in identification please.

Thanks!

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adampembs
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Re: Identification please?

Post by adampembs » Sun Nov 04, 2018 10:44 am

Honey fungus, Armillaria mellea or maybe A.ostoyae
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Flaxton
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Re: Identification please?

Post by Flaxton » Sun Nov 04, 2018 4:41 pm

No sign of yellow on the ring so I would go with A ostyae

brandy piece
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Re: Identification please?

Post by brandy piece » Sun Nov 04, 2018 7:24 pm

Thanks Flaxton and adampembs.

I had wondered (with some excitement) about it being a Death Cap as it shared some of its characteristics (i.e. gills, stem, ring and cap - although the cap was more a light brown colour then the more often associated pale green). And hints of a volva at the base, but only when examined after long decayed. A bit similar to this one: https://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/topic/1505971. I'd be interested to know why you both ruled out the Amanita phalloides?

mollisia
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Re: Identification please?

Post by mollisia » Sun Nov 04, 2018 9:19 pm

Hello,

Amanita phalloides is a completely different fungus in nearly all respects.

The gills of your fungus are not free, but reach the stipe. The ring has a different consistency and has a brownish margin, which would not be in Amanita. The cap has a brownish colour A. phalloides would never have and there a tiny scales on it - A. phalloides never has scales. The stipe has no volva and doesn't show the greenish girdles that are characteristic for Amanita phalloides.
Things you can check additionally are the different smell (honey-like in A. phalloides) and a completely separable cuticule which is not so in Armillaria.

best regards,
Andreas

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adampembs
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Re: Identification please?

Post by adampembs » Sun Nov 04, 2018 9:33 pm

brandy piece wrote:
Sun Nov 04, 2018 7:24 pm
Thanks Flaxton and adampembs.

I'd be interested to know why you both ruled out the Amanita phalloides?
Andreas has explained well, but for me a couple of other reasons. One, I have seen Honey fungi on 100s or even 1000s of occasions so I can recognise it instantly.
Two, I have never seen Death cap, it is quite rare. I've seen False Death Cap on a dozen or so occasions. Also the honey-ish colour of the gills and cap hence its name. Most (if not all) of the Amanitas have pure white, not honey coloured gills. They really do look completely different when you have an eye for them.
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