Fungus on Gorse, help with ID please

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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Nick Highland
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Fungus on Gorse, help with ID please

Post by Nick Highland » Sat Nov 03, 2018 8:13 am

Glen Convinth, Highland Scotland

Growing on low almost ground level old Gorse branch situated under mature oak trees

2nd October 2018

Bit short on candidates that would typically be on Gorse, any suggestions really appreciated.

Thanks,

Nick
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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Fungus on Gorse, help with ID please

Post by Lancashire Lad » Sat Nov 03, 2018 9:32 am

Hi,

Looks like Hypholoma fasciculare - Sulphur Tuft.

Gorse, (Ulex), is a known "associated organism" for H. fasciculare.

Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.

Nick Highland
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Re: Fungus on Gorse, help with ID please

Post by Nick Highland » Sat Nov 03, 2018 1:27 pm

Hi Mike

Thanks, had considered Sulphur Tuft as possible from appearance but then failed to find the association with Gorse so was very unsure, now it makes sense. Appreciated.

Nick

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Re: Fungus on Gorse, help with ID please

Post by Lancashire Lad » Sat Nov 03, 2018 1:47 pm

Nick Highland wrote:
Sat Nov 03, 2018 1:27 pm
Hi Mike

Thanks, had considered Sulphur Tuft as possible from appearance but then failed to find the association with Gorse . . . .
Hi,

You can find known "associated organisms" by going to the Fungal Records Database of Britain and Ireland website: -
http://www.fieldmycology.net/FRDBI/FRDBI.asp

Once there, click on the "associated organism" tab near the top.

Then, in the search box, type the Latin name of the "organism" that you want to find out if your fungus has been recorded with.
(in this case Ulex - that being the Latin name for Gorse).

Having done that, a list of all fungi associations with which Ulex has been named appears.
It's then just a case of browsing down the list to see if your suspected fungus species is named.

If it's there, you can then click on the name of the fungus, and it will bring up details of all of the records where that particular fungus was noted in association with that particular "organism".

Note - In this case, there are more records of Ulex being associated with Hypholoma fasciculare var. fasciculare, than there are records of it associated with Hypholoma fasciculare.

Here, both names relate to Sulphur Tuft - just that in the case of "Hypholoma fasciculare", the recorder didn't use the full Hypholoma fasciculare var. fasciculare name when submitting the record. - But both are exactly the same species.

( You have to interpret the results when such thing occur! ;) )

Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.

Nick Highland
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Re: Fungus on Gorse, help with ID please

Post by Nick Highland » Sat Nov 03, 2018 3:47 pm

Thanks Mike,

Excellent resource I had not come across, I was just looking at field guides which did not mention anything other than broad leaved and coniferous trees. I'm glad you covered the variety interpretation in advance though.

Regards,

Nick

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