Small ones in my lawn - are they dangerous to small children?

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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Please do not ask for the identification of fungi for edibility or narcotic purposes. Any help provided by forum members is on the understanding that fungi are not to be consumed. Any deaths or serious poisonings are the responsibility of the person eating or preparing the fungus for others. If it is apparent from a post that the fungus is for eating or smoking etc, the post will be deleted and a warning given. Although many members do eat fungi, no-one would be willing to take someone else's life into their hands.
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RobD
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Small ones in my lawn - are they dangerous to small children?

Post by RobD » Sat Aug 04, 2018 3:11 pm

I have a small lawn that was turfed about 18 months ago and there are small cone headed fungi appearing. Say about 20-30 every few days. I took a few pics and am wondering a) can I eradicate them and b) do I need to with small children playing on the lawn?
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adampembs
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Re: Small ones in my lawn - are they dangerous to small children?

Post by adampembs » Sat Aug 04, 2018 7:14 pm

If children are at the age where they put anything into their mouths, I would recommend adult supervision at all times when in gardens. There are many plants that are poisonous as well as fungi not to mention other health hazards such as animal faeces.
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Re: Small ones in my lawn - are they dangerous to small children?

Post by adampembs » Sat Aug 04, 2018 7:18 pm

By the way, this looks like a Panaeolus species (the Mottlegills) - they are not edible nor deadly poisonous.
https://www.first-nature.com/fungi/pana ... isecii.php

Why not embrace them as a wonder of nature to teach the children rather than see them as a threat?
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RobD
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Re: Small ones in my lawn - are they dangerous to small children?

Post by RobD » Sat Aug 04, 2018 8:06 pm

Thanks for the reply and info. Oh yes there’s been a teach-in with the eldest; i was just concerned if our youngest might grab them and put them in her mouth. Of course we supervise closely but we had not seen the fungi at all until then there were lots. !

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Re: Small ones in my lawn - are they dangerous to small children?

Post by mollisia » Sat Aug 04, 2018 8:24 pm

Hello,

there are two different species on the foto:
The slightly bigger, brown one, that you depictured also as single fruitbody: This is very likely Panaolus foeniseii. Not poisonous, but some populations are hallucinogenic in larger quantities - other collections are not.
The smaller, greyish-whitish ones are ink-caps. Don't know which species, but all these are not known to be poisonous though they are on the other hand not known to be edible.

best regards,
Andreas

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Re: Small ones in my lawn - are they dangerous to small children?

Post by adampembs » Sat Aug 04, 2018 11:26 pm

In terms of eradicating fungi, this is pretty much impossible without destroying your lawn. The fruit bodies you see are part of a buried network called a mycelium. This is the fungus. Removing the fruit bodies doesn't cause any significant damage to the fungus. Many fungi play an important role in breaking down dead plant material, and helping to release nutrients back into the soil. Others form symbiotic relationships with plants. In fact, the majority of plants have mycorrhizal relationships with fungi, where both partners benefit, and without the fungus, the plant won't do so well.
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