Tiny white balls on stalks on b-l wood bark

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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Aciauda
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Tiny white balls on stalks on b-l wood bark

Post by Aciauda » Thu Jul 19, 2018 3:06 pm

This fungus looked like some white dust on the bark of a stick and the shorn off end of a twig. It was under alder and the stick was very hard to break. Under low power of dissecting microscope looks like this.
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Under higher powers of the dissection microscope it shows as made up of a cluster of white balls that are slightly furry at highest power x7.
The attachment Tiny white balls on short stems 5 at 2.5.jpg is no longer available
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Under low power of compound microscope, at x10 and x40 objectives it looked like a ball with spores decorating the surface evenly.
The attachment Tiny white balls on short stems x 10.jpg is no longer available
The attachment Tiny white balls on short stems x 40.jpg is no longer available
Tiny white balls on short stems x 40

Under the x60 objective the structure is of dichotomously branching tortuous hyphae ending in spherical spores with a short stubby ‘apiculus’.
The attachment Tiny white balls on short stems x 60 (2).jpg is no longer available
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Tiny white balls on short stems x 60 (5).jpg

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Chris Yeates
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Re: Tiny white balls on stalks on b-l wood bark

Post by Chris Yeates » Thu Jul 19, 2018 4:04 pm

Sadly the only image which has appeared is heavily over-stained - it's often worth working with unstained material first (perhaps you did but those images have not appeared).
One solution might be the anamorphic form of Bulbillomyces farinosus. See http://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?sear ... +farinosus
Was the material collected in a site that might be seasonally wet?

Regards
Chris
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

Aciauda
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Re: Tiny white balls on stalks on b-l wood bark

Post by Aciauda » Fri Jul 20, 2018 8:52 am

Thank you for this help. I have looked at your link and agree that my fungus fits the description of Bulbillomyces farinosus. Yes it was collected from a wet place, that would be wet all the year round, the edge of Coppice Pond Bingley St Ives. I shall try to get my images up there better next time.

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Chris Yeates
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Re: Tiny white balls on stalks on b-l wood bark

Post by Chris Yeates » Fri Jul 20, 2018 11:56 am

Hi
Great stuff. This is an example of an "aero-aquatic" fungus in which the fungus (usually the anamorphic stage) is adapted to living in seasonally-wet conditions. See viewtopic.php?f=6&t=1874 for more info. Most of these fungi - unlike the Bulbillomyces, are asco's.
One sees very similar tiny white balls which can float off as propagules with another basidiomycete, Subulicystidium longisporum, with its splendid "razor-wire" cystidia and elongate basidiospores. This is an example of convergent evolution, as the two species are not related - even at the ordinal level.
Subulicystidium longisporum.jpg
Best wishes
Chris

PS lots of people have had problems with loading images - I think there is a thread about how to solve the problems.
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

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Re: Tiny white balls on stalks on b-l wood bark

Post by adampembs » Fri Jul 20, 2018 12:40 pm

Chris Yeates wrote:
Fri Jul 20, 2018 11:56 am


PS lots of people have had problems with loading images - I think there is a thread about how to solve the problems.
I think this is now fixed. :o (for new posts)
Adam Pollard
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Aciauda
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Re: Tiny white balls on stalks on b-l wood bark

Post by Aciauda » Fri Jul 20, 2018 2:32 pm

Many thanks again Chris. This is very helpful and encouraging. And thank you, too for the links you have sent me to my own email address. Mike Valentine has emailed to remind me where the snags lie in uploading images. I shall do another posting of another fungus soon.

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Re: Tiny white balls on stalks on b-l wood bark

Post by Lancashire Lad » Fri Jul 20, 2018 3:43 pm

Aciauda wrote:
Fri Jul 20, 2018 2:32 pm
Many thanks again Chris. This is very helpful and encouraging. And thank you, too for the links you have sent me to my own email address. Mike Valentine has emailed to remind me where the snags lie in uploading images. I shall do another posting of another fungus soon.
There's been some progress since I emailed you Archie, and it looks like the multiple image uploading problem has finally been solved!
(Great work Adam!).

Hopefully, you (and everyone else) should now be able to go back to uploading (where required) multiple images just like you would always have done before the problem reared its head.

Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.

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