Which Amanita?

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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johnbalcombe
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Which Amanita?

Post by johnbalcombe » Fri Jan 19, 2018 1:39 pm

A found a few of these last week, and again this week, in coniferous woodland (larch/pine). In early January after a hard frost, I was really surprised. The frost may well have affected the cap colour. Gills free. Spores 7.0-9.7 x 8.0-12.2 µm. Any thoughts? A. citrina?
Attachments
IMG_9623 small.jpg
IMG_9619 small.jpg
IMG_9589 cystidia.jpg
IMG_9610 small.jpg
IMG_9610 spores 7.0-9.7 x 8.0-12.2 um small.jpg

roy betts
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Re: Which Amanita?

Post by roy betts » Fri Jan 19, 2018 4:20 pm

What about A. junquillea (syn. gemmata)?
A. citrina can be identified by its strong raw potato smell.

johnbalcombe
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Re: Which Amanita?

Post by johnbalcombe » Fri Jan 19, 2018 7:09 pm

Thanks Roy,

The smell was faintly mushroomy so no, it did not have the raw potato smell of A. citrina, which I should have realised. I found quite a few examples of A. gemmata a couple of months back but in a very different location (oak/beech). It could well be gemmata I guess.

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