Colourful Entoloma

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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Heucherella
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Colourful Entoloma

Post by Heucherella » Tue Jan 16, 2018 4:54 pm

I like waxcaps, so often go looking on the unimproved grasslands on the coast near me in North Devon. But I also find Entolomas, and I have decided that I do not like Entolomas!!

This one, however, is quite pretty, but doesn't seem to look like any in my books - help please?

I found it at the end of September. The stipe was a really bright blue, and the cap a definite lilac.

Thanks
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New at this, so full of questions!

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adampembs
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Re: Colourful Entoloma

Post by adampembs » Tue Jan 16, 2018 10:32 pm

Smell is an important feature with many mushrooms :D - did it smell of mouse pee?
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Heucherella
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Re: Colourful Entoloma

Post by Heucherella » Wed Jan 17, 2018 7:01 am

No, I did not have any particular smell.
New at this, so full of questions!

roy betts
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Re: Colourful Entoloma

Post by roy betts » Wed Jan 17, 2018 10:18 am

Now you're in deep! This is one of the sub-genus Leptonia, and you need 'specialist literature' (or at least Funga Nordica): there are lots with blue stipes and brownish caps.
A microscope is also essential to observe the gill cystidia (if any) and the spore shape & size. More difficult to observe are the pigmentation in the cap cuticle (and even worse) the presence or absence of clamps. Many a happy hour.....

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Heucherella
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Re: Colourful Entoloma

Post by Heucherella » Wed Jan 17, 2018 8:00 pm

Oh dear...i am still trying to learn the easy ones... Trust me to find a difficult one..!

I do now have a microscope, so am starting to get to grips with it, but found this before I got it.

Thanks for your help.. It may have to remain unidentified for now.. Although I did dry it and keep it.
New at this, so full of questions!

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Re: Colourful Entoloma

Post by mollisia » Thu Jan 18, 2018 7:38 am

Hello,

if you have dried and kept the fuitbody, there is a chance to determine it (one day), especially as you have a foto of it for the colours and shape. A better sight of the cap (striate, finely squamulose, ...) would have been important may be.

But be warned, as Roy says, the examination of Entoloma is not the task a microscope-beginner should start with .... It is often not easy to clearly see the details you need, the species are hundreds, and a lot of microscopical details are to be observed.

Nevertheless, those Leptonias are one of the most beautiful fungi, and their importance for conservation arguments for unimproved grassland is equal to Hygrocybe, Clavarias, Geoglossum and similar CHEG-species.

best regards,
Andreas

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