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Waxcaps?

Posted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 10:19 am
by Lee Dingain
I don't think there is much I can do to identify these two but I think they are waxcaps of some kind?

Re: Waxcaps?

Posted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 9:36 pm
by mushroom mike
They look very much like Hygrocybe psittacinathe Parrot Waxcap.

Re: Waxcaps?

Posted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 5:02 pm
by roy betts
I agree with Mike on the first image but the second collection is too far gone to identify (altho' they are Waxcaps).

Re: Waxcaps?

Posted: Fri Jan 05, 2018 5:05 pm
by Lee Dingain
Thanks Mike and Roy. Can I ask what identifies the first image as Parrot Waxcap rather than any other waxcap? I'm very new to fungi ID so I'm keen to learn any distinguishable features. Many thanks.

Re: Waxcaps?

Posted: Sat Jan 06, 2018 11:45 am
by roy betts
Well, there is a lot you can do to identify a fresh Waxcap (or any other gilled fungus). First you need to make a detailed description of it to identify first the Genus and then the species. If you've no idea of the Genus then spore colour is the first requirement (in the case of the fungus in the first image this will be white). 'Good' Field Guide's will have a key to Genera or you can work through the white-spored section of the book and look at the illustrations. With this specimen you should get to Hygrocybe (s.l.).
Then it gets more tricky! You need to know the colour of the cap, gills and stem and whether the cap and stem are dry, greasy, viscid or glutinous. Some will have viscid caps but dry stems etc. The colours will change with age and weather (some start scarlet then go yellow finally fade to white/buff), and in sunny conditions all species will dry out making assessment of the cap/stem surface more difficult - this is why you need fresh specimens! Some waxcaps have distinctive smells (honey, garlic, bed-bugs). Type of gill attachment is also useful to know.
Your second image shows a mostly overmature, and probably frosted, collection of varied colours.
Your first image is a fresh specimen. Without any description to go by, there needs to be at least one image of the cap and one of the stem and gills.
Hygrocybe psittacina is the only 'yellow' waxcap with green tones. Sometimes other colours are present. There is always some green: sometimes there is a lot, sometimes little (in which case it is usually present at the apex of the stem). You have not shown a view of the stem... so we a guessing. The cap is already discolouring but the gill colour is what I would expect from 'The Parrot'... but it's only a guess from experience.
If there is no green anywhere then it's a different ball game as there are quite a few yellow/orange species. In some cases checking the spore size and shape and type of cells in the gill trama is necessary to confirm identity. Like many genera, Waxcaps can be difficult to begin with and if you're serious you need a microscope and a book just on Waxcaps (like Fungi of Northern Europe Vol.1 by Boertmann).