Frosty finds

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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annie
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Frosty finds

Post by annie » Thu Dec 28, 2017 9:12 pm

Hello all,

Thanks for your previous help with my question.

I've come across a couple of things today I'd love some help with. The first is an inkcap found under a gorse bush on heathland in Surrey. I was wondering if it could possibly be Coprinus silvaticus? Or would it require microscopy to know? Sorry the pics aren't better, they were somewhat inaccessible!

The second is a rather wonderful jelly fungus, maybe an Exidia? It was growing alongside a Tremella on a rotting felled oak, again heathland/ mixed woodland.

Just received Roger Phillips book (1981 edition) for Christmas which seems a perfect introduction for a novice like me. Any other book recommendations would also be very welcome.

Thanks again!
Annie
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roy betts
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Re: Frosty finds

Post by roy betts » Sat Dec 30, 2017 8:57 am

With Ink Caps, observe the cap surface before using a microscope. One of the commonest species is C. micaceus; this has a covering of granular whitish flocks when fresh (but these can disappear with age, heavy rain etc.).
C. silvaticus doesn't have these; it is in the Section which has cystidia on the cap (microscope needed to see these).
Other 'Coprinus' species may have a powdery cap coating (made of globose cells) or a cobwebby coating (made of long cells). You can often get to the right Section by close observation of the cap. So you can get to know some species, like micaceus, 'in the field' but species like silvaticus have many 'look alikes' (about 25) which need a microscope to determine.
Have a look at this key: https://www.grzyby.pl/coprinus-site-Kee ... inus.htm#A
The Jelly may be Exidia nucleata (but I don't really "do" these!).
Good, but out of print, Field Guides are those by Bon and also Courtecuisse & Duhem. The Collins Guide by Buczacki has a lot of species, and Geoff Kibby's new book must be worth getting if you're just starting out.

marksteer
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Re: Frosty finds

Post by marksteer » Sat Dec 30, 2017 8:03 pm

I would suggest Collins Complete (not!) Guide to British Mushrooms and Toadstools Sterry and Hughes 2009. Out of print but 2nd hand copies usually available via Amazon etc. Glossy pages with photos and small enough to carry in the field
'The more I know the more I realise I don't know'

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Chris Yeates
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Re: Frosty finds

Post by Chris Yeates » Sat Dec 30, 2017 10:10 pm

marksteer wrote:
Sat Dec 30, 2017 8:03 pm
I would suggest Collins Complete (not!) Guide to British Mushrooms and Toadstools Sterry and Hughes 2009. Out of print but 2nd hand copies usually available via Amazon etc. Glossy pages with photos and small enough to carry in the field
Dare I say I wouldn't take any book into the field, other than a notebook. Far better IMHO to make notes in the field (far easier now with digital cameras) and take two or three carefully collected specimens back with you, make a spore print and work things out at home. With the combination of characters thus obtained you are far more likely to learn - and you can post your suggestions here - see Roy's comments here: viewtopic.php?f=4&t=1902#p9299
and the general info re identification here: viewtopic.php?f=4&t=49
best wishes
Chris
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

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adampembs
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Re: Frosty finds

Post by adampembs » Sun Dec 31, 2017 1:19 pm

marksteer wrote:
Sat Dec 30, 2017 8:03 pm
I would suggest Collins Complete (not!) Guide to British Mushrooms and Toadstools Sterry and Hughes 2009. Out of print but 2nd hand copies usually available via Amazon etc. Glossy pages with photos and small enough to carry in the field
I keep seeing this myth about it being out of print. It's available from everywhere. Where has this myth come from?
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Collins-Comple ... ungi+guide
https://summerfieldbooks.com/collins%2D ... ols%7E2327
http://www.pemberleybooks.com/product/c ... ngi/18001/
Adam Pollard
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