Cort, Hebeloma or something else

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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adampembs
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Cort, Hebeloma or something else

Post by adampembs » Sat Dec 02, 2017 7:04 pm

Cap and stem were dry. Spores slightly roughened. All too small for Hebeloma, so I guess I'm looking at Cortinarius and I suppose it ends there unless anyone has any ideas. I'm not sure if the gill edge shot is showing true cheilocystidia.

Growing mainly with Hazel and beech
Attachments
Cort-Heb.jpg
Cort-HebGills.jpg
DSCF4301.jpg
DSCF4302.jpg
DSCF4303.jpg
Yellow brown spore print, no iodine reaction
Hebeloma-0001w.jpg
Spores 6-7 x 4 -4.7
Hebeloma-0003.jpg
Gill edge
Adam Pollard
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roy betts
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Re: Cort, Hebeloma or something else

Post by roy betts » Sun Dec 03, 2017 11:29 am

Looks familiar somehow! I would call the spore print cream to yellowish which doesn't suggest either Hebeloma or Cortinarius (although under the microscope they appear more brown). Hebeloma should have obvious cystidia, so I'd agree it may be a Cortinarius. Something like C. ochroleucus has spores about the right size but this is in Section Myxacium with a glutinous cap and stipe.

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adampembs
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Re: Cort, Hebeloma or something else

Post by adampembs » Sun Dec 03, 2017 2:48 pm

Thanks Roy. It was dry when I found it, but it has leaves sticking to the cap. I think FN uses the synonym C.emollitoides for ochroleucus. It describes the spores as almost smooth, which matches nicely, I could only just see they were roughened. Also describes the cap as "very slightly viscid to almost dry" and the stem "weakly viscid." I think we have a match! :D

PS I later scraped the spores into a pile and the colour matches cinnamon in my chart.
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