Fungus on acid heathland

Please try to include photos to show all parts of the fungus, eg top, stem, and gills.
Note any smells, and associated trees or plants (eg oak, birch). A spore print can be very useful.
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Please do not ask for the identification of fungi for edibility or narcotic purposes. Any help provided by forum members is on the understanding that fungi are not to be consumed. Any deaths or serious poisonings are the responsibility of the person eating or preparing the fungus for others. If it is apparent from a post that the fungus is for eating or smoking etc, the post will be deleted and a warning given. Although many members do eat fungi, no-one would be willing to take someone else's life into their hands.
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Ernesto
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Fungus on acid heathland

Post by Ernesto » Thu Nov 02, 2017 10:34 am

I would appreciate some guidance on this. Found in acid heathland on decayed wood (most probably conifer) on 1 Nov.
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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Fungus on acid heathland

Post by Lancashire Lad » Thu Nov 02, 2017 3:00 pm

Hi,

I'd say this has the looks of Gymnopilus penetrans (Common Rustgill).

Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.

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Chris Yeates
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Re: Fungus on acid heathland

Post by Chris Yeates » Thu Nov 02, 2017 3:48 pm

Lancashire Lad wrote:
Thu Nov 02, 2017 3:00 pm
Hi,

I'd say this has the looks of Gymnopilus penetrans (Common Rustgill).

Regards,
Mike.
Yes, or G. sapineus, impossible to separate without microscopy - it's down to the width of the cap hyphae
"You must know it's right, the spore is on the wind tonight"
Steely Dan - "Rose Darling"

Ernesto
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Posts: 31
Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2015 3:12 pm

Re: Fungus on acid heathland

Post by Ernesto » Thu Nov 02, 2017 4:08 pm

Thank you Mike and Chris. I suppose that another contestant could be G. hybridus given the habitat and the faint cracks appearing on the cap?

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