Melastiza

Steve
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Melastiza

Post by Steve » Mon Jan 18, 2016 9:15 pm

Here is my fellow fungus-finder on our way to the shops. This one is a fungus in an urban landscape - Aleuria aurantia is always popping up in unexpected places in our bit of Sheffield. This is the first time I've seen it on tarmac.
Steve
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DSCF0250.jpg
Aleuria aurantia in tarmac, 2 miles south of Sheffield City Centre.

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FungiJohn
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Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by FungiJohn » Mon Jan 18, 2016 9:37 pm

This is excellent Steve

Cheers - John

mollisia
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Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by mollisia » Mon Jan 18, 2016 11:11 pm

Hello Steve,

great foto, indeed!
Did you check the Aleuria microscopically, they look quite strange (probably due to the location in the street).

best regards,
Andreas

Ditiola
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Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by Ditiola » Tue Jan 19, 2016 6:40 pm

Leif wrote:
Ditiola wrote: I use an Olympus 7 _ 14 mm I bought it second hand a few years ago. But to buy new now would cost a small fortune. It still performs well at f22 and has very little barrel distortion even at 7mm
Lovely photos. I was surprised to find that my Nikon 28mm lens only stopped down to F16, most disappointing. Out of interest which focal length did you tend to use for the photos you posted?

I forgot to say. My Olympus SLT has a four thirds sensor so the lens is equivolent to 14 _ 28 on a 35 mm camera I prefer to use it as wide as possible. The problem is that the closes that it will focus is 29 cm from the film plane Therefore you have to have a large fungus to use it full wide angle so most of the time it is used at around 20 mm (35 mm) equivalent

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Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by Leif » Tue Jan 19, 2016 9:05 pm

mollisia wrote:Hello Steve,

great foto, indeed!
Did you check the Aleuria microscopically, they look quite strange (probably due to the location in the street).

best regards,
Andreas
I was about to say the same. In my view the shape is wrong, more likely a Melastiza species, or Pulvinula convexella (not uncommon on sandy/stony soil down here) or something else.

Leif
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Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by Leif » Tue Jan 19, 2016 9:08 pm

Ditiola wrote:
Leif wrote:
Ditiola wrote: I use an Olympus 7 _ 14 mm I bought it second hand a few years ago. But to buy new now would cost a small fortune. It still performs well at f22 and has very little barrel distortion even at 7mm
Lovely photos. I was surprised to find that my Nikon 28mm lens only stopped down to F16, most disappointing. Out of interest which focal length did you tend to use for the photos you posted?

I forgot to say. My Olympus SLT has a four thirds sensor so the lens is equivolent to 14 _ 28 on a 35 mm camera I prefer to use it as wide as possible. The problem is that the closes that it will focus is 29 cm from the film plane Therefore you have to have a large fungus to use it full wide angle so most of the time it is used at around 20 mm (35 mm) equivalent
Thanks Peter. I am thinking about a 20mm lens for a FX/DX camera, the 28mm one being not wide enough. Sounds like it will be fine. 4/3 is tempting, but too pricey to change now.

Steve
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Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by Steve » Thu Jan 21, 2016 5:57 pm

Hi Andreas,
Yes I did check it out as I hoped it might be Melastiza as it was on a stony substrate but it had some spores with small spikes on the end, so I was pretty sure it was Aleuria aurantia. I was surprised how similar Melastiza cornubiensis (Melastiza chateri) is to Aleuria aurantia microscopically (Fungi of Switzerland). - it's the hairs I need to look for for Melastiza. I may have another look at another specimen, without keeping an eye on my granddaughter at the same time. Although some of these had dark margins I think it was just deterioration of the edge, rather than hairs.
Cheers,
Steve
Attachments
DSCF0252.JPG
Field (street!) photo
DSCF0253.JPG
Cropped image of another part of the colony

Flaxton
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Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by Flaxton » Thu Jan 21, 2016 6:36 pm

These are definitely Melastiza Steve.
Mal

Steve
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Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by Steve » Fri Jan 22, 2016 6:13 pm

Hi Mal,
I'm going out tonight with my torch on the way to the beer-off to suss out one with dark margins! I had another look at the slide (dried out) and shoved some methylene blue on it. After all the havoc wreaked by squashing and chemicals, as well as frost, I don't expect the spores will measure too accurately - up to about 20 x 11.
Are these little projections at the spore ends of any significance? I've never found Melastizia chateri so I don't know how the reticulations compare with Aleuria aurantia.
Anyway, here are the spores for what they are worth :D
Steve
Attachments
Orange Peel spores.jpg
Spores im methylene blue (revived slide)

Ditiola
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Re: Fungi in the Landscape

Post by Ditiola » Fri Jan 22, 2016 7:39 pm

Hi Steve

This is the key that I have:

Peter

Key to British species of MELASTIZA
1. Disc white when fresh; hairs white; ascospores shorter than 15.0 µm ..………………… M. rozei
1. Disc orange to red when fresh; hairs brown; ascospores longer than 15.0 µm .………………… 2
2. Ascospores 22.0 - 28.0 x 10.0 - 15.0 µm; spore ornamentation coarse, of large, irregular warts, commonly 3.0 - 5.0 µm across, up to 14.0 µm across at poles ………………… M. contorta
2. Ascospores 15.0 - 21.0 x 7.5 - 10.5 µm; spore ornamentation of a complete or incomplete reticulum, sometimes with warts at the nodes, warts generally smaller than 2.0 µm across, up to 6.5 µm across at poles …………………..……………..………………………………… 3
3. Spore ornamentation of mainly isolated warts, interconnected with narrow ridges forming an incomplete network .…………..... M. flavorubens
3. Spore ornamentation lacking warts, composed of ridges forming a complete network ………………….. M. cornubiensis (= M. chateri)

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