Which Bolete is This?

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Stork3103
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Which Bolete is This?

Post by Stork3103 » Wed Sep 16, 2015 7:14 pm

Hello all,

This is my first post on here although I have had an interest in fungi for quite a few years. I like to photograph them. I have eaten a few and remain a fully functioning sentient being which is always a plus. I stick to just a few species for eating to lessen the odds of an organ liquifying mishap.

Anyway I was out in the woods over the last couple of day and came across a good number of what I believe to be boletus edulis. However they were all found in beech forests. There's not a conifer in sight. My field guide says boletus edulis grows mainly in coniferous forests. The only mention of boletes under beech trees are for ones not considered good to eat.

The first two attached photos are of a giant specimen I discovered this morning. It had been knocked over (or perhaps had fallen under its own weight). It was growing on a mossy bank under which is gravel. There is plenty of leaf litter around and as you can just see in the photo of me holding the fungi, it was growing in a group which numbered around ten specimens. I have big hands so I would say the cap is about 18cm wide. Some of the smaller fungi in the group had creamy coloured tubes. The big one had yellow/olive coloured tubes as you can see. The smaller ones had a lovely 'mushroomy' smell. The large one also smelt good but there was a hint of acridity probably owing to the age of the specimen.

I was in a different beech forest a few miles away yesterday and I picked about ten identical specimens for drying and use in cooking (third photo). I put some fresh pieces into an omelette and there was a very subtle 'mushroom' flavour. The dried ones are now very aromatic. I feel a risotto coming on.

So my question really is does the boletus edulis grow under beech trees or this another fungi of the bolete family?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/26634968@ ... ed-public/https://www.flickr.com/photos/26634968@ ... ed-public/https://www.flickr.com/photos/26634968@ ... ed-public/

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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Which Bolete is This?

Post by Lancashire Lad » Thu Sep 17, 2015 10:05 am

Hello and welcome to UK Fungi.

I'm sorry if my response here appears somewhat blunt, but forum rules regarding edibility are clearly highlighted in red (above). - Since your post mentions eating and cooking several times, the intent of your enquiry is perfectly clear.

Consuming wild fungi is not to be taken lightly, as there could easily be life threatening consequences.
See: - viewtopic.php?f=3&t=388 and read Nicholas Evans' story.

You ask "Which Bolete is this?" and go on to say that yesterday,from a "Beech forest", you "picked about ten identical specimens for drying and use in cooking (third photo). I put some fresh pieces into an omelette and there was a very subtle 'mushroom' flavour"

You then ask "does Boletus edulis grow under Beech" ? ? ? ?

Eating fungi and then asking for confirmation of what they might have been afterwards is a recipe for disaster!

I make no comment as to the identification of your fungus, and suspect this thread will be deleted shortly by Admin.

Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.

Leif
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Re: Which Bolete is This?

Post by Leif » Thu Sep 17, 2015 10:13 am

I agree. Whilst Penny Buns do grow under beech, oak etc, and yours do look like Penny Buns, the problem is that you have no idea who I am. So, you logon to a forum, ask "Is this edible", and a chap who happens to be allowed access to the interweb from within the secure institution in which he is housed replies with "Yes mate, without doubt that is edible", and gets pleasure from knowing that you will soon be eating a death cap. You see the problem? Whereas if you go on a walk with an experienced person who is known to be knowledgeable, you are okay. Note that even among those who lead courses and walks, many are at best not very knowledgeable. Often people here say "The more I learn, the more ignorant I feel". It's true.

Stork3103
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With Reference to My Previous Post

Post by Stork3103 » Thu Sep 17, 2015 9:31 pm

Dear all,

My previous post "Which Bolete is This?" has been taken out of context.

Yes I discussed eating the specimens in question but at no point did I ask anybody to verify whether those particular fungi were edible. I had already taken that decision in every confidence. I knew the fungi I had picked were edible...I was simply asking for clarification on a point that had arisen from the content of my field guide, i.e. is boletus eduli known to grow beneath beech trees? I had consulted other sources which had said they do, which in part informed my decision to eat the fungi.

I would never ask a third party, especially one I don't know, for an opinion on whether any fungus is edible. Equally if a third party ever offered me an assurance that a fungus was edible, without them being familiar with every aspect of its provenance, I would never dream of consuming that fungus.

I actually wrote a line in the original draft of my post stating "this is not a request for opinions on whether this fungus us edible." I deleted it as I thought it perfectly clear that I had already made that decision. It now seems I should have left it in.

Given that assurance, I wonder if anybody would be willing to discuss my original question.

Regards,

Stork.

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Lancashire Lad
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Re: With Reference to My Previous Post

Post by Lancashire Lad » Fri Sep 18, 2015 11:43 am

Hello Stork,

You say that you had taken the decision to eat the fungi in every confidence that you knew they were edible.

You had, based upon your field guide and "other sources", already decided that they were Boletus edulis - with sufficient confidence that you were not risking your life by eating them.

By definition, having found them in a Beech forest, and having then eaten them, you had decided that Boletus edulis do grow with Beech.

Why then, if you were so confident as to what they were, would there be any need to be subsequently asking "which Bolete is this?", and "do Boletus edulis grow in Beech forests?".

Do you see the dilemma here? ;)

As to discussing your original question, as Leif has already confirmed: - "Penny Buns do grow under beech, oak etc., and yours do look like Penny Buns . . . " - but do you accept what he says? ;)

I would again refer you to the forum rule above "Please do not ask for the identification of fungi for edibility . . . . . Any help provided by forum members is on the understanding that fungi are not to be consumed"., and trust that you will accept the reasons behind that rule.

If you have an interest in fungi in general, you are more than welcome to post any future identification requests - but please steer clear of any discussion inferring or relating to edibility.

To avoid having several threads relating to the same topic, I will combine these two posts with the original "Which Bolete Is This" topic.
I will again lock the thread as I think we have taken this as far as it needs to go, and as UK Fungi's rules are clear, there is no need for a prolonged *open forum" debate on the edibility subject. (Feel free to PM me if you do want to add anything).

Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.

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adampembs
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Re: With Reference to My Previous Post

Post by adampembs » Fri Sep 18, 2015 10:16 pm

Stork3103 wrote:Dear all,

My previous post "Which Bolete is This?" has been taken out of context.

Given that assurance, I wonder if anybody would be willing to discuss my original question.

Regards,

Stork.
The context is defined by the forum in which it was posted - "Fungi ID requests (post here if you aren't sure what type of fungus you've found)"

If you had posted this under general fungi discussion, the context would have been different, and in fact, the rule regarding edibility is not explicitly applied in any other forum besides the Fungi ID requests one. However, the general culture is of conservation which is currently being undermined by the foraging craze.

I hope you take an interest in fungi beyond edibility (perhaps you already do.) I have to admit, it's how I started, but now I seldom eat anything because of the over-exploitation that has been going on. it's not sustainable at the current level of craze it has become. I am now more interested in protecting the habitats that are left, you just have to see the few sad remnants of our ancient scots pine forests in Scotland to appreciate this.

Picking 10 massive fruitbodies like these is not being sensitive to the ecology of the forest. One would have been plenty. Although it doesn't damage the fungus, it does affect its ability to spread to new areas, by removing the source of spores.

I'll move this to General Fungi Discussion, but will leave it locked.

To answer your question, Beech is a common host for it. It is a rather promiscuous fungus, also found with oak, birch, and others.
Adam Pollard
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