Cantharellus subpruinosus

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adampembs
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Cantharellus subpruinosus

Post by adampembs » Sun Jul 12, 2015 5:22 pm

I am pleased to see the FRDBI has recorded my first finding of this species in the UK. Voucher material was sent to Kew last year and it has now been entered in the database.
http://www.fieldmycology.net/FRDBI/FRDB ... BNum=59481

I found it again today and also found C.cibarius [actually C.amethysteus] about 200 metres from it. The subpruinosus was growing on a mossy bank under Beech and the 'cibarius' was on the side of a muddy track under oak. Here are some photos of them side by side. They look very different, although I believe this is a group that hasn't had comprehensive genetic studies carried out yet, so they may be reclassified at some point. The specific name refers to the pruina (powdery covering.)
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P1010310.JPG
C.amethysteus(left) Cibarius subpruinosus (right)
P1010311-001.JPG
C.amethysteus(left) Cibarius subpruinosus (right)
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Re: Cantharellus subpruinosus

Post by marksteer » Sun Jul 12, 2015 6:40 pm

Good find and record!
'The more I know the more I realise I don't know'

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Re: Cantharellus subpruinosus

Post by Waxcap » Sun Jul 12, 2015 6:43 pm

Congrats Adam, I remember it well. Another reminder of how much was lost when WAB was shut down.

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Re: Cantharellus subpruinosus

Post by adampembs » Sun Jul 12, 2015 7:42 pm

Yes Dave, and I remember and appreciated your help! :)
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Re: Cantharellus subpruinosus

Post by mollisia » Fri Jul 17, 2015 11:31 am

Hi Adam,

your Cantharellus cibarius is in fact Cantharellus amethysteus (or cibarius var. amethysteus, though I have no doubt that it is a species on its own).
It's not only the purple scales on the cap, but also the cap colour is a bit colder yellow than in cibarius, but the underside of the cap is more apricot than in cibarius. Thus you have slightly different colours in cap and underside in amethysteus, whereas cibarius ss. str. is equally coloured throughout. Furthermore the veins are more sharp and pronounced in amethysteus than in cibarius. And the last thing concerns a bigger size and stronger rusty discolouration in amethysteus compared to cibarius.

best regards,
Andreas

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Re: Cantharellus subpruinosus

Post by adampembs » Fri Jul 17, 2015 12:11 pm

Welcome back to our community, Andreas!

Wow! So my supposedly more common Cantharellus is not so common! (or most likely under-recorded)
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Re: Cantharellus subpruinosus

Post by mollisia » Fri Jul 17, 2015 8:19 pm

Hello Adam,

in some regions here in germany amethysteus is more common than cibarius.

It is notworthy, that you have obviousely found subpruinosus ans amethysteus in the same location, though they have only slightly overlapping ecology. C. subpruinosus is usually found on basic soil, even calcareous, but can grow on neutral soil too. Amethysteus is growing only on acid soil, like cibarius, and therefore does not often meet subpruinosus. But I know of a few locations in my areas here where also both are growing together. This is the case in Fagus forests on acid, but mineral rich soil. They are then accompanied usually by a lot of other Cantharellus/Craterellus species: cornucopioides, friesii, tubaeformis, undulatus and cibarius ss. str.

But that doesn't necessarily need to be the same in Britain of course ....

best regards,
Andreas

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Re: Cantharellus subpruinosus

Post by adampembs » Fri Jul 17, 2015 9:38 pm

Pembrokeshire has some complex geology. There is a lot of acidic volcanic rock, overlaid in some places by sedimentary rock, including old carboniferous and devonian limestone. There are places where it mixes. Our water is soft, and soil tends to be acidic to neutral. I have only seen the C.subpruinosus growing through the moss, on raised mounds. The beeches are mature but not ancient, if memory serves, 100-120 years old.

A discussion on the BMS facebook page mentions that the most recent work "The order Cantharellales in the Iberian Peninsula and the Balearic Islands - thesis by Ibai Olariaga Ibaguren (2005)" considers C.subpruinosus to be a form of C.pallens. This genus really needs the phylogenetic work ! :)
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