Fungal finds from Essex

User avatar
Ganoderma resinaceum
Regular user
Posts: 129
Joined: Thu Oct 20, 2016 8:39 pm
Location: South East
Contact:

Re: Fungal finds from Essex

Post by Ganoderma resinaceum » Fri Dec 16, 2016 8:12 am

Not at all rare, but more splendid in terms of the abundance of the fruiting bodies of Phellinus pomaceus (and the lack of predominant resupination - they're largely all brackets, being formed on the main stem and thus needing to re-orientate the hymenium) on this cherry plum (Prunus cerasifera). The tree was literally covered from the lowest part of the stem to the highest pruning wound in fruiting bodies, and with kind permission of the property owner I had access to trapse over their front lawn to get photos! :D
Attachments
Phellinus pomaceus Prunus cerasifera 1.jpg
Phellinus pomaceus on cherry plum
Phellinus pomaceus Prunus cerasifera 2.jpg
Phellinus pomaceus on cherry plum
Phellinus pomaceus Prunus cerasifera 3.jpg
Phellinus pomaceus on cherry plum
Phellinus pomaceus Prunus cerasifera 4.jpg
Phellinus pomaceus on cherry plum
Phellinus pomaceus Prunus cerasifera 5.jpg
Phellinus pomaceus on cherry plum
Phellinus pomaceus Prunus cerasifera 6.jpg
Phellinus pomaceus on cherry plum

User avatar
Ganoderma resinaceum
Regular user
Posts: 129
Joined: Thu Oct 20, 2016 8:39 pm
Location: South East
Contact:

Re: Fungal finds from Essex

Post by Ganoderma resinaceum » Tue Dec 20, 2016 8:26 pm

This was one I spotted around a month ago, and I was in fact drawn to the oak (Quercus robur) by the bleedin' huge Laetiporus sulphureus on an old limb tear-out. However, it was only when I clambered beneath the tree that I noticed the lovely arrangement of Daedalea quercina higher up along the main stem and around an old branch wound (plus a few further up). Yes, it isn't all that uncommon, though is a very pretty poroid and seeing it out in the field is always fun. It's also a versatile fungus, having seen it on small branches at Windsor (5-6cm in diameter) and massive fallen trunks at Hampstead Heath.
Attachments
Daedalea quercina Quercus robur 1.jpg
Daedalea quercina (oak mazegill) on oak
Daedalea quercina Quercus robur 2.jpg
Daedalea quercina (oak mazegill) on oak
Daedalea quercina Quercus robur 3.jpg
Daedalea quercina (oak mazegill) on oak
Daedalea quercina Quercus robur 4.jpg
Daedalea quercina (oak mazegill) on oak
Daedalea quercina Quercus robur 5.jpg
Daedalea quercina (oak mazegill) on oak

User avatar
Ganoderma resinaceum
Regular user
Posts: 129
Joined: Thu Oct 20, 2016 8:39 pm
Location: South East
Contact:

Re: Fungal finds from Essex

Post by Ganoderma resinaceum » Wed Jan 11, 2017 5:18 pm

This is a really sweet one from the other day - in the sense of the host tree just looking splendid. Here we can see a weeping pagoda tree (Styphnolobium japonicum 'Pendula'), which is sporting a single Pleurotus sp. (suspecting Pleutorus dryinus) on one of the larger contortions. The chances are that I won't ever come across such an association again, so thought I'd share this with yourselves too!
Attachments
Styphnolobium japonicum 'Pendula' Pleurotus 1.jpg
Pleurotus sp. upon the pagoda tree
Styphnolobium japonicum 'Pendula' Pleurotus 2.jpg
Pleurotus sp. upon the pagoda tree
Styphnolobium japonicum 'Pendula' Pleurotus 3.jpg
Pleurotus sp. upon the pagoda tree
Styphnolobium japonicum 'Pendula' Pleurotus 4.jpg
Pleurotus sp. upon the pagoda tree
Styphnolobium japonicum 'Pendula' Pleurotus 5.jpg
Pleurotus sp. upon the pagoda tree

User avatar
Ganoderma resinaceum
Regular user
Posts: 129
Joined: Thu Oct 20, 2016 8:39 pm
Location: South East
Contact:

Re: Fungal finds from Essex

Post by Ganoderma resinaceum » Tue Jan 31, 2017 6:42 pm

I'm cheating a tad with this one as it's actually from the New Forest, but it's a cool find so wanted to share it - Mensularia nodulosa on beech (Fagus sylvatica). This particular beech was clad with various fungal species, though it was this one that is perhaps the most important from a recording perspective, given its apparent infrequent presence. Quite brilliantly, this beech was absolutely smothered in this fungus, from half way up the bole to along the scaffold limbs. Frankly, the exact number of spores being released must be huge, which is important in the longevity of this fungus - assuming it can out-cross with other genotypes. The massive abundance perhaps also implies latent invasion prior to significant colonisation (once the beech became stressed - it's nearly dead now), as securing such a spatially huge area is no mean feat! Granted, the large number of pruning wounds around the area perhaps takes credence away from this supposition, as the typical means of entry for Inonotus species (including the genera that the species fragmented into) is probably via exposed sapwood (such as following pruning).

For reference, this was confirmed as this species the very next day (I was only stopping off for a few hours), so a huge thanks to the individuals involved in getting to the tree to confirm.
Attachments
fagus-sylvatica-various-fungi-wood-decay-whole.jpg
Mensularia nodulosa (syn. Inonotus nodulosus).
fagus-sylvatica-mensularia-nodulosa-chondrostereum-1.jpg
Mensularia nodulosa (syn. Inonotus nodulosus).
fagus-sylvatica-mensularia-pleurotus-ostreatus-1.jpg
Mensularia nodulosa (syn. Inonotus nodulosus).
fagus-sylvatica-mensularia-nodulosa-chondrostereum-2.jpg
Mensularia nodulosa (syn. Inonotus nodulosus).
fagus-sylvatica-mensularia-nodulosa-1.jpg
Mensularia nodulosa (syn. Inonotus nodulosus).
fagus-sylvatica-mensularia-nodulosa-2.jpg
Mensularia nodulosa (syn. Inonotus nodulosus).

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests