Fungal finds from Essex

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Ganoderma resinaceum
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Fungal finds from Essex

Post by Ganoderma resinaceum » Fri Nov 25, 2016 9:13 pm

Firstly, I want to say thanks to Adam and Mike for allowing me to create this topic. :D

The purpose of this thread is to document some interesting fungi I find whilst out exploring the landscape. My job as an arboricultural officer means I am always around and outside in urban areas during the week, and I thus come across many hundreds of trees as a consequence. Much of what I find are the bracket fungi (Polyporales and Hymenochaetales), though some dead snags and parkland trees provide for some great saprophytic caps. There's also the odd gem. Urban woodlands and woods on the fringe of the urban-rural matrix are also abundant in the local area, and thus photos from those places will be added as and when I locate fungi that might be of interest to you all.

I won't overload this thread with images, but will reserve it for the 'best' bits out there.

Without further ado...

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Re: Fungal finds from Essex

Post by Ganoderma resinaceum » Fri Nov 25, 2016 9:20 pm

Here's one I came across the other day. It's a poplar (likely a hybrid black pop - Populus x canadensis), and it is sporting an absolute beast of a Rigidoporus ulmarius bracket around 3-4m up. This is interesting as this fungus is one I have attributed to being a 'butt rotter', and often it's almost flat against the ground / no more than 50cm up. Indeed, I have seen photos of it further up the trunk but never myself (until now), though its positioning here amongst the first major break in the tree is very curious. No doubt that the brown rot induced is causing some issues mechanically, and because the wood dries out it doesn't 'flex' and therefore the hormonal response by the tree that signals reaction growth might well be less pronounced than if it were a white rot (such as a Ganoderma sp.) instead. The size of the bracket also suggests that a lot of wood density has been lost by virtue of the cellulose being removed.
Attachments
rigiulm1.jpg
Rigidoporus ulmarius (giant elm bracket) on poplar
rigiulm2.jpg
Rigidoporus ulmarius (giant elm bracket) on poplar
rigiulm3.jpg
Rigidoporus ulmarius (giant elm bracket) on poplar
rigiulm4.jpg
Rigidoporus ulmarius (giant elm bracket) on poplar
rigiulm5.jpg
Rigidoporus ulmarius (giant elm bracket) on poplar

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Re: Fungal finds from Essex

Post by Ganoderma resinaceum » Sat Nov 26, 2016 1:16 pm

Here's another interesting one from recent weeks that hopefully people here will appreciate.

When out surveying trees, this very beautiful Abortiporus biennis was sitting just out from the base of this large poplar. Amongst the abundance of abscised leaves, it was quite difficult to spot. Certainly the best example of this fungus I have seen where it is not just a mess of pores on a white mass.
Attachments
PopAbortibiennis1.jpg
Abortiporus biennis
PopAbortibiennis2.jpg
Abortiporus biennis
PopAbortibiennis3.jpg
Abortiporus biennis
PopAbortibiennis4.jpg
Abortiporus biennis
PopAbortibiennis5.jpg
Abortiporus biennis

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Re: Fungal finds from Essex

Post by Ganoderma resinaceum » Tue Nov 29, 2016 5:51 pm

An utterly massive Perenniporia fraxinea on an old beech pollard at Epping. It's a good 1m across. My army knife is thrown in for a reference, and that knife is around 12cm in length. Also note the Ganoderma australe beneath around the buttress zone.

This huge deck of Perenniporia fraxinea is actually older than me, and I am in my mid twenties! A testament to the public not damaging it, its own persistence to keep on laying down new growths, and nature at large.
Attachments
PfraxineaFagus1.jpg
Perenniporia fraxinea on Fagus sylvatica.
PfraxineaFagus2.jpg
Perenniporia fraxinea on Fagus sylvatica.
PfraxineaFagus3.jpg
Perenniporia fraxinea on Fagus sylvatica.
PfraxineaFagus4.jpg
Perenniporia fraxinea on Fagus sylvatica.
PfraxineaFagus5.jpg
Perenniporia fraxinea on Fagus sylvatica.

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Re: Fungal finds from Essex

Post by Ganoderma resinaceum » Sat Dec 03, 2016 12:50 pm

Here's an interesting one. A dead birch (Betula pendula) laden with red-banded polypore (Fomitopsis pinicola). This was found at Hatfield Forest around a month ago, and there were in fact dozens of fruiting bodies on various standing and fallen birch stems (perhaps from two or three trees) in a small segment of the woodland.
Attachments
Fomitopsis pinicola Betula pendula 1.jpg
Fomitopsis pinicola on a birch stem
Fomitopsis pinicola Betula pendula 2.jpg
Fomitopsis pinicola on a birch stem
Fomitopsis pinicola Betula pendula 3.jpg
Fomitopsis pinicola on a birch stem
Fomitopsis pinicola Betula pendula 4.jpg
Fomitopsis pinicola on a birch stem

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Re: Fungal finds from Essex

Post by Ganoderma resinaceum » Wed Dec 07, 2016 5:31 pm

Whilst Rigidoporus ulmarius is a common poroid fungus in the southern half of England (on various species), seeing it on elder (Sambucus nigra) is a rare sight. After seeing a photo of this association around a year ago, I got to see an example today in the flesh in Wickford, Essex. Over the moon! :D
Attachments
Rigidoporus ulmarius Sambucus nigra 1.jpg
Rigidoporus ulmarius on an elder
Rigidoporus ulmarius Sambucus nigra 2.jpg
Rigidoporus ulmarius on an elder
Rigidoporus ulmarius Sambucus nigra 5.jpg
Rigidoporus ulmarius on an elder
Rigidoporus ulmarius Sambucus nigra 3.jpg
Rigidoporus ulmarius on an elder
Rigidoporus ulmarius Sambucus nigra 4.jpg
Rigidoporus ulmarius on an elder
Last edited by Ganoderma resinaceum on Wed Dec 07, 2016 8:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Fungal finds from Essex

Post by Flaxton » Wed Dec 07, 2016 7:55 pm

Ganoderma resinaceum wrote:Whilst Rigidoporus ulmarius is a common poroid fungus in the UK :D
Not the further north you go. Rare on any substrate up here.
Mal

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Re: Fungal finds from Essex

Post by Ganoderma resinaceum » Wed Dec 07, 2016 7:59 pm

I'd swap it for Fomes fomentarius. ;)

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Re: Fungal finds from Essex

Post by Flaxton » Thu Dec 08, 2016 10:25 am

Now that's everywhere ;)

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Re: Fungal finds from Essex

Post by Ganoderma resinaceum » Wed Dec 14, 2016 7:15 pm

A little less grandiose here, but I came across this silver maple (Acer saccharinum) stump today and it sported two fungi that I have not seen associated with this species before: Daldinia concentrica (unless there is another very similar Daldinia species) and Trametes gibbosa (the stumpgrinder fungus, named as such because of its aggressive colonisation strategy as a latecomer to the decay party, and because of its intense white rot that quite literally works like a mycological stumpgrinder). The stump also is colonised by Bjerkandera adusta, but that's everywhere!

What is interesting about the Trametes gibbosa is that it is emanating from behind the bark, which is peeling away from the wood. This means there's a more regulated microclimate behind the bark, and therefore the rot will likely be a deep-seated one further down the stump and away from the cut surface (where Bjerkandera seemed to reign!).
Attachments
Acer saccharinum Daldinia Tramates 1.jpg
Acer saccharinum stump with Daldinia
Acer saccharinum Daldinia Tramates 2.jpg
Acer saccharinum stump with Daldinia
Acer saccharinum Daldinia Tramates 3.jpg
Acer saccharinum stump with Daldinia
Acer saccharinum Daldinia Tramates 4.jpg
Acer saccharinum stump with Trametes
Acer saccharinum Daldinia Tramates 5.jpg
Acer saccharinum stump with Trametes

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