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Blue-green hyphomycete

Posted: Mon Jul 08, 2019 5:44 am
by Aciauda
I hope this is the correct forum for this query
Please help with id. I have searched E&E but cannot find it
It was found on a stick with beech ash and oak in mixed woodland. The general view is with a 5p coin 11mm in diameter

Close up appearance
gv with 5p piece 11mm diam
gv with 5p piece 11mm diam
LP diss mic
LP diss mic
Medium diss mic
Medium diss mic
The wood of the stick was very rotten, broad leaf
wood possibly beech?
wood possibly beech?
The hyphae branched at more or less right angles and the conidiophores were lecithiform, like skittles.
Photo 5
Photo 5
Photo 6
Photo 6
Photo 7
Photo 7
The spores were greenish in water subglobose 3.6x2.9 μm
Phot 8
Phot 8

Re: Blue-green hyphomycete

Posted: Thu Jul 11, 2019 11:48 am
by Chris Yeates
Hi
I would check out Trichoderma for starters (anamorphic Hypocreales). The conidiophores (phialides in this case) are actually not lecythiform - they are flask-shaped, the head of the "skittle" being a conidium being budded off.
Hope that helps
Chris

Re: Blue-green hyphomycete

Posted: Thu Jul 11, 2019 5:24 pm
by Aciauda
Hi Chris
Thank you, I have checked out E&E and found Chromocrea aureoviridis to be nearest. It did not seem to fit exactly so I went onto Google Images to find a paper by Priscila Chaverri and Gary J. Samuels - 'Hypocrea/Trichoderma... with green spores'. That seemed to be right. It offers a key to the species reported which is ok till I get to the couplet
15. Phialides on average > 8.5 μm long ............................................................................................................... 16
Phialides on average < 8.5 μm long ............................................................................................................... 21
My phliades are 6.5-8 μm long
And the .pfd key runs out there. So I am stuck
I think I am on the right track, though. Do you agree?
Yours aye
Archie

Re: Blue-green hyphomycete

Posted: Thu Jul 11, 2019 6:08 pm
by Lancashire Lad
Aciauda wrote:
Thu Jul 11, 2019 5:24 pm
. . . . And the .pfd key runs out there. So I am stuck . . . .
Hi Archie,

The PDF you have, as you have already discovered, ends at page 36. - (The full paper PDF is actually 119 pages in total).

This link allows PDF download of that full paper, (wherein the dichotomous key obviously continues accordingly): -

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Pr ... ion_detail

(You have to click on the blue "Download Full-Text PDF" link, towards top right corner of page).

NB: when you click on that link, you get an interim page which mentions (not immediately obvious) that your download is in progress.
Just wait a few seconds, (without clicking on anything else), and the full 119 page PDF will appear.

Regards,
Mike.

Re: Blue-green hyphomycete

Posted: Sat Jul 13, 2019 6:18 pm
by Aciauda
Hi Mike
This is very helpful. I have downloaded the .pdf from your link and am trying to save it. In the meantime I have rushed through the rest of the key and can see I shall have to take this more slowly. My hyphomycete does not key out yet. I will persist and tell you where the key leads me in the end.
Many thanks again
Yours aye
Archie

Re: Blue-green hyphomycete

Posted: Sat Jul 13, 2019 7:26 pm
by Chris Yeates
Hi Archie
A much more up to date treatment is here (again open source and downloadable):
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 1614000505. It has lots of useful references, and despite the title is of relevance to Britain (especially with climate change ;) ).
But do bear in mind these are tricky waters, unless you are at the least culturing the stuff. Fun to have a run at mind :)
Best
Chris

Re: Blue-green hyphomycete

Posted: Mon Jul 15, 2019 7:53 pm
by Aciauda
Oh dear, Chris, I am well out of my depth but delighted at the information in this link of yours. The depth of the experience of these authors and the utter beauty of their illustrations I will remember and keep in my new Trichoderma folder. But I see what you mean. It was as I feared it might be. I have tried again and again over the years to identify Hyphomycetes and nearly always failed. That is why I thought I might get a glimmering of hope by asking you all at FungusUK. Now I have seen all this that you and Mike have shown me I fear I must back off again. There is no way that I shall be able to produce even the light microscope information far less the EM and culture information. I actually had three specimens I was going to bring to you for a little help.
I think on balance that having ventured to the doorway of another huge gallery of the fungal world I must just turn round and go 'home' to more chunky world of caps and stems, ascomycetes, crusts and brackets, etc.
Thank you both very much for such a huge amount of help. I am delighted and amazed and severely chastened.
With all good wishes
Archie