Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by Lancashire Lad » Wed Aug 31, 2016 3:17 pm

Thanks Nelly.

Did another trip to the Lakes on Bank Holiday Monday, and, being as it was a bank holiday, I wanted a walk that would be away from the “madding crowds”, and so decided to do a few of the more easterly fells.

Starting from Cow Bridge car park near Brothers Water, and walking in via the tiny hamlet of Hartsop, I took the Hayeswater Gill footpath up to Hayeswater, and then struck up the rather boggy path leading directly to the ridge of The Knott, leading towards High Street.

Passing beyond the summit of The Knott, and heading towards the Straights of Riggindale, Hayeswater again comes into partial view way down below to the right hand side. I stopped to take a quick photo, and, through the viewfinder, out of the corner of my eye, glimpsed something moving. – It was one of Lakeland’s herd of wild red deer. I’d long known about this herd, but had never actually spotted them before. – A nice unexpected surprise!

Having now seen one, I realized that quite a few deer were within sight. I counted eleven, but assumed that more of the herd would have been out of sight “around the corner” of the fell-side. I’m pretty sure they saw me before I saw them, but I managed to get a few shots off before they slowly ambled away out of sight.

At the straights of Riggindale, I took a short there-and-back detour, in order to visit the summit of Kidsty Pike. Then, back on the main ridge, it was up to High Street summit, and onwards to Thornthwaite Beacon.

From there, dropping steeply down to the small col at Threshthwaite Mouth, (what a horrible loose-slippy-stony descent that is!), I continued up to Stony Cove Pike, and across to the Atkinson Memorial cairn, before descending back to valley level via Caudale Moor.

Back in the valley at Caudale Bridge, I followed the public footpath through Sykeside to Hartsop Hall, and beside Brothers Water shore back to the car.

Fungi-wise, lots of Hygrocybe's, Entoloma's, Galerina's, and a few Mottlegills to be seen on the fells.

Regards,
Mike.

GPX track of the walk: -
# GPS Track - 1 to 25000 Scale (1).jpg
and a few pics. from the day: -
( If you want to see a few more pics from this walk, they can be found here: - https://www.walklakes.co.uk/talk/viewto ... ?f=2&t=421 ).

Photo descriptions in list form below, to ensure that thumbnails show correctly in grid-layout.
Photo 1 - Looking across Hayeswater towards High Street.
Photo 2 - Red Deer on The Knott.
Photo 3 - Looking across Dove Crag to the Scafell massif.
Photo 4 - Great Gable, seen on the horizon behind Dove Crag, Hart Crag, and Fairfield etc.
Photo 5 - Looking towards the Helvellyn range from the Atkinson Memorial Cairn, on Caudale Moor.
Photo 6 - Looking across Dovedale from Caudale Moor.
Attachments
02 Looking Across Hayeswater to High Street.jpg
01
06 Wild deer on the flanks of The Knott.jpg
02
10 Looking across Dove Crag to the Scafells etc..jpg
03
18 Great Gable, behind Dove Crag, Hart Crag, Fairfield etc., from High Street.jpg
04
26 Looking towards the Helvellyn range from the Atkinson Memorial.jpg
05
30 Dovedale from Caudale Moor.jpg
06
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NellyDee
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by NellyDee » Sun Sep 04, 2016 4:27 pm

I do like the way you describe your walks and the photos are lovely. Pity there is not a 'like' button, so I could just give you the thumbs up that I have read this. Fungi coming up in abundance here, just wish it would stop raining so I could get out and take more photos.

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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by Lancashire Lad » Thu Sep 15, 2016 3:42 pm

Thanks once again Nelly.

Another trip to the Lakes yesterday, along with my sister and her friend, who wanted to do the Jack's Rake scramble on Pavey Ark.

We began the walk from the National Trust car park adjacent to the New Dungeon Ghyll Hotel. Walking up Stickle Ghyll to Stickle Tarn, and then around the tarn and up the short scree slope which marks the foot of the Jack's Rake scramble.
Then up Jack's Rake to Pavey Ark summit, and across to Harrison Stickle, followed by Pike of Stickle.
From Pike of Stickle, we back-tracked to the point where a path skirts around Harrison Stickle's flanks, continuing by the side of the Dungeon Ghyll ravine on the descent to Pike Howe, and finally back to our start point in Langdale valley.

Weather wise, the day was mostly very sunny - exceptionally warm and humid for the time of year.
The pull up from valley to Stickle Tarn is always a bit of a drag, but this time I swear I almost melted away!

On our arrival at Pavey Ark summit, the weather took a quick turn for the worse, with the sky just to one side of us suddenly going quite gloomy, accompanied by thunder & lightning, with visible dark streaks of heavy rain showers to be seen on the not so distant fells.
Luckily for us, we were on the very edge of the passing storm and didn't get rained on at all. - It passed by as quickly as it arrived, and we were soon bathed in sunshine once again - all within a timescale of about half an hour.

Despite carrying over 7 litres of water between us, long before the walk was finished, we'd drunk all we had, and had to resort to stream water and purification tablets. Always a last resort - but by no means as bad as the old style chlorine tablets we had to use back in the day.
Anyone old enough to remember those will no doubt remember just how bad the water tasted when using them.
It tasted so bad we often risked drinking the water just as it came - even when we could see there were tiny things swimming around in it! :shock:

Just in case anyone is interested, when necessity dictates, I now use "Oasis Water Purification Tablets" - one small tablet purifies a litre of water - killing anything that might be lurking in there within 30 minutes. They contain Sodium Troclosene (Sodium dichloroisocyanurate), and they do give the water a slightly chemical taste - but it is by no means unpalatable when you are thirsty!

Fungi wise, lots of Waxcaps and Galerina's to be seen, along with one or two Mycena's here and there.

I didn't take many photos on this walk, since, for the peaks involved, it largely mirrored my solo walk of a few weeks ago: -
viewtopic.php?f=11&t=695&start=20#p6199

However, the GPS track and a few pics are included below.

Regards,
Mike.

GPS Track of the walk: -
#GPS Track - 1 to 25000 Scale(1).jpg

And a few pics from the day: - (Photo descriptions in list form below, to ensure that thumbnails show correctly in grid-layout).
Photo 1 - Stickle Ghyll, with Tarn Crag immediately to its right, and Pavey Ark at top left. - Taken from the summit of Pike Howe.
Photo 2 - Looking down to Langdale Valley from Pike Howe summit.
Photo 3 - Looking across Langdale to Side Pike and Lingmoore Fell - again from Pike Howe summit.
Attachments
01 Stickle Ghyll from Pike Howe.jpg
01
02 - Langdale from Pike Howe.jpg
02
03 Side Pike from Pike Howe.jpg
03
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adampembs
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by adampembs » Thu Sep 15, 2016 10:01 pm

Fantastic! Why is the visibility always so good for you? Friends in high places? boom boom. :D
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NellyDee
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by NellyDee » Tue Sep 27, 2016 9:07 am

Had a couple of smiles :) Adam's "Why visibility so good" and your use of water purifying tablets. Maybe it is because all my hill walking years were spent in central to highland Scotland. Always drank from the burns (streams) had one small bottle which was filled up en route.
Visibility, lol, lost count of the number of times the clouds came down on reaching a high point.

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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by Lancashire Lad » Mon Oct 03, 2016 7:11 pm

Thanks for your comments folks, as always, much appreciated.

Adam - I've had plenty of walks in the past where the visibility and or weather were less than ideal - Just that they don't make for good photos so I only tend to post those walks where the pics can do them justice.
(Plus, these days, with more free time on my hands, I try to optimise my chances, and tend to wait for a reasonable weather forecast before venturing forth ;) ).

As Sunday’s weather forecast promised lengthy sunny periods, I had another jaunt to the lakes, and decided on a walk to Dow Crag and Coniston Old Man. Two peaks that I haven’t visited in a good number of years.
At just 6.4 miles, this was a fairly short walk, with intentions of finding and photographing Charmer’s Gravestone (see footnote below), and climbing South Rake on Dow Crag.

Starting at Walna Scar parking area, I followed the Walna Scar Road towards Torver Bridge, until a point some 100 yards past the second “Rock Door”, where I took the path rightwards, into “The Cove”.
Before reaching Goat’s Water, having spent a few minutes looking, I was pleased to find Charmer’s Gravestone, intact, and more-or-less where I’d expected it to be from the subtle clues I’d gleaned from previously seen photos.
From Goat’s Water, I followed the faint climber’s track up the steep scree slope to the foot of Dow Crag’s main rockface, before turning leftwards across Great Gully’s imposing entrance, to make my way into the lesser confines of South Rake.

I stopped for lunch near Dow Crag summit, taking in the spectacular vista of the Scafell range, panoramic views across Morecambe Bay to the hills of North Wales, and, on this occasion, a clearer than usual view of the Isle of Man. Then it was onwards to Goat’s Water Hause, and up to Coniston Old Man, where there must have been at least fifty people milling around. A few quick photos from the summit, before descending by the Low Water path, – passing through the always impressive remains of the abandoned quarry workings and levels, and then taking the right hand fork in the path leading directly back to the Walna Scar parking area. – Another great day in the Lakes!

Footnote: Charmer’s Gravestone is an iconic artefact amongst Lakeland’s fell-walking fraternity. A simple piece of rock, roughly carved with the words “CHARMER 1911”, in tribute from its owner, to a foxhound which became cragfast on Dow Crag, before falling and dying from its injuries.
Having previously been subject to the vandalism of uprooting and throwing aside, it was rediscovered some years ago, and re-erected at the position where it rests today. (Unfortunately, the stone appears to be slowly sinking into the boggy ground upon which it sits, and only the letters CHAR and digits 19 can now be seen). Since its precise original location had been lost, the stone no longer marks the actual final resting place of Charmer, but nevertheless, deserves to be treated with respect.
Accordingly, its exact whereabouts is never openly disclosed, but it can be found by determined folks willing to spend a few minutes looking. I had not previously seen it, but was able to find it from details visible in published photographs. However, in keeping with time honoured tradition, I have deliberately put the accompanying photo out of sequence, and have amended the GPX track to anonymise the specific location.

Fungi wise, lots of Galerina's, a few Mycena's and lots of Waxcaps. (A quick shot of H.ceracea below).

Regards,
Mike.

GPS track of the walk: -
#GPS Track - 1 to 25000 Scale(1).jpg
GPS track of the walk.
And a few pics from the day: -
(If you would like to see more pics from this walk, see: - https://www.walklakes.co.uk/talk/viewto ... ?f=2&t=426

Photo descriptions in list form below, to ensure that thumbnails show correctly in grid-layout.
Photo 1 - Walna Scar Road, Brown Pike & Buck Pike.
Photo 2 - Some of the impressive buttresses and gully's on Dow Crag.
Photo 3 - Looking up South Rake on Dow Crag.
Photo 4 - The Scafell range from Dow Crag summit.
Photo 5 - Isle of Man from Dow Crag summit.
Photo 6 - Dow Crag from Coniston Old Man summit Plateau. (South Rake is at the left hand side of the photo).
Photo 7 - Abandoned quarry workings on the slopes of Coniston Old Man.
Photo 8 - Charmer's Gravestone.
Photo 9 - Hygrocybe ceracea - Butter Waxcap.
Attachments
01 Walna Scar Road, Brown Pike & Buck Pike.jpg
01
07 Dow Crag.jpg
02
08a South Rake.jpg
03
11a The Scafell's from Dow Crag summit.jpg
04
10 Isle of Man from Dow Crag.jpg
05
14 Dow Crag from Coniston Old Man summit plateau.jpg
06
17 Abandoned quarry workings.jpg
07
00a Charmer's Gravestone.jpg
08
21 Hygrocybe ceracea - Butter Waxcap.jpg
09
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by NellyDee » Wed Oct 05, 2016 8:24 am

I do think there ought to be a 'Like' button or something to show that a post has been read and liked (very much).

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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by Lancashire Lad » Mon Oct 10, 2016 6:53 pm

Thanks once again Nelly, your comments are always appreciated.

A fairly good weather forecast for Sunday saw me making another jaunt to the Lake District, and my favourite area – Great Langdale.
My trip this time had the primary intentions of continuing the “break-in” of some recently purchased heavy duty winter boots, along with finding and photographing the Packwoman’s Grave (see footnote) near Rossett Pike.
As it turned out, the day was quite mixed, weather-wise, with lengthy periods of sunshine, and quite dull and overcast skies in equal measure. But light winds, no rain, excellent long distance visibility, and the onset of autumn colours, made for a great day to be out on the fells.

Starting from the NT car park at the Old Dungeon Ghyll Hotel, I walked to the head of Mickleden Valley and then over the footbridge towards Rossett Gill. For the climb of Rossett Gill, I chose to follow the old “direct route”, immediately beside the gill and through the ravine.
Since the construction of the nearby pitched path, which contours the ascent over easier gradients, hardly anyone climbs the gill directly, and virtually no trace of a path can now be found.

A leisurely half-hour detour onto the open fell-side and my search for the Packwoman’s grave was fulfilled. After removing some obviously recently placed stones, (I think that such relics of antiquity should be treated with respect and left as near as possible to their original condition – to me, adding new stones desecrates the site, giving it no more relevance than a cairn!), I took a few photographs and made my way back into the ravine to continue the climb.

Reaching “Rossett Hause” (a name coined by myself for the saddle-like area between Rossett Pike and Hanging Knotts), I stopped for lunch and then continued beyond Angle Tarn to Tongue Head, there leaving the main path, and bearing southwards up to Ore Gap. From there, I headed towards Bowfell, walking and scrambling along the edge of the ridge as much as possible, to make the best of the superb views back towards the Langdale Pikes.

Up at Bowfell summit, I was pleased to discover that the sun was in just the right position to highlight the Ordnance Survey bench mark “arrow”, chiselled into one of the large summit boulders. I’ve been there many times, but had never previously seen it showing such pronounced definition. After spending some time taking in Bowfell's glorious summit views, I decided to head back down to Langdale by way of the Great Slab and Climber’s Traverse, continuing down The Band to Stool End Farm and the ODG Hotel.

Regards,
Mike.

Footnote: - The Packwoman’s Grave is another of Lakeland’s relatively little known antiquities. Reputedly marking the burial place of an elderly “hawker” who travelled Lakelands high-fell passes in the late 18th century, peddling her wares. She had apparently died during a winter snowstorm having been unable to find her way off the fells. Whether fact, or merely folklore, there is little in the way of documented evidence to support the story, but a rather poignant (and lengthy!) poem by T H Collinson, MA, tells the tale very well.
That poem can be found here: - http://lakelandhuntingmemories.com/PackwomanNew.html
(Edited 28/06/17 to replace the above link - previous one was no longer valid).

GPS track of the walk: -
#GPS Track - 1 to 25000 Scale1.jpg
And a few pics from the day.
( If you would like to see several more photos from this walk, see: - https://www.walklakes.co.uk/talk/viewto ... ?f=2&t=428 ): -

Photo descriptions in list form below, to ensure that thumbnails show correctly in grid-layout.
Photo 1 - Autumn sunshine and dark skies above the Langdale Pikes.
Photo 2 - Looking up to Flat Crags, Cambridge Crag, & Bowfell Buttress.
Photo 3 - The Packwoman's Grave.
Photo 4 - The Langdale Pikes seen across Rossett Pike, taken from near Tongue Head.
Photo 5 - The Langdale Pikes, taken from somewhere above Cambridge Crag on the way to Bowfell summit.
Photo 6 - The Ordnance Survey bench mark arrow, at Bowfell summit.
Attachments
01 The Langdale Pikes.jpg
01
05 Flat Crags, Cambridge Crag, & Bowfell Buttress.jpg
02
06 Packwoman's Grave.jpg
03
09 The Langdale Pikes.jpg
04
15 Langdale Pikes.jpg
05
19 Ordnance Survey Datum Arrow on boulder at Bowfell summit.jpg
06
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NellyDee
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by NellyDee » Sun Oct 23, 2016 4:52 pm

Interesting and lovely photos as usual :)

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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by Lancashire Lad » Fri Nov 04, 2016 11:36 am

Thanks once again Nelly.

Another great day out in the Lakes on Wednesday - I decided to do Helvellyn, (yet again! :D ), but by a different route.

After parking the car in a small layby on the A592, I took the footpath through the grounds of the Patterdale Hotel, heading into Grisedale.
My route eventually took me past Ruthwaite Lodge and onwards to Grisedale Tarn, with impressive views of the crags of Nethermost Pike and Dollywaggon Pike to my right, and St. Sunday Crag to my left, along the way.

Nearing Grisedale Tarn, I spotted the Brothers Parting stone, with its associated nameplate sign, so decided to take a photo. Unfortunately, the words inscribed on the rock are difficult to read, and were made almost impossible to photograph with the light being against me, giving very little contrast.
(There is much information online about how the famous Wordsworth verse inscribed on the stone came to exist).
The words inscribed on the rock read: -
“Here did we stop; and here looked round
While each into himself descends,
For that last thought of parting Friends
That is not to be found.
Brother and friend, if verse of mine
Have power to make thy virtues known,
Here let a monumental Stone
Stand sacred as a Shrine.”


From Grisedale Tarn, I headed up to Dollywagon Pike summit, then following the eastern edge of the ridge along to Nethermost Pike, and eventually, Helvellyn summit. Hardly a cloud in the sky, along with crystal clear air clarity, meant that the autumnally coloured panoramic views to be had whilst walking along the summit ridge were superb.

Worth noting that although it was for the most part a fine sunny day, what wind there was, coming from a northerly direction, was bitingly cold. Air temperature on the tops was hovering at not much above freezing, with ice to be seen on small boggy pools on Nethermost Pike’s summit ridge.

After taking in the views from Helvellyn, I decided to make my way back to Patterdale by down climbing Striding Edge, then along to the Hole-in-the-wall, descending on the Patterdale side of Birkhouse Moor towards Brownend Plantation and Grisedale Bridge, before finally walking the short distance along the A592 back to the car.

Regards,
Mike.

GPS Track of the Walk: -
# GPS Track - 1 to 50000 scale.jpg
And a few pics from the day.
( If you would like to see more photos from this walk, see: - https://www.walklakes.co.uk/talk/viewto ... ?f=2&t=437 ).

Photo descriptions in list form below, to ensure that thumbnails show correctly in grid-layout.
Photo 1 - Looking over autumnally coloured foliage in Grisedale Valley, to Dollywaggon & Nethermost Pikes.
Photo 2 - The head of Grisedale, with Dollywaggon Pike & Nethermost Pike prominent on the horizon.
Photo 3 - The Brothers Parting Stone
Photo 4 - The western vista from Dollywaggon Pike.
Photo 5 - Looking across Ruthwaite Cove to St.Sunday Crag, with Hard Tarn at lower left.
Photo 6 - Yours truly on Helvellyn summit plateau, with Red Tarn, Striding Edge, and a distant Ullswater behind.
Attachments
01 Looking up Grisedale to Nethermost & Dollywaggon Pikes.jpg
01
02 Dollywaggon Pike.jpg
02
04 Brothers Parting.jpg
03
06 Looking west - from Dollywaggon Pike.jpg
04
08 Hard Tarn in Ruthwaite Cove, with St.Sunday Crag beyond.jpg
05
16 Yours truly with Red Tarn & Striding Edge Behind.jpg
06
Common sense is not so common.

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