How to define a mycologist?

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marksteer
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Re: How to define a mycologist?

Post by marksteer » Thu Aug 13, 2015 4:49 pm

Leif wrote:I think many here can describe themselves as amateur field mycologists. It is harder to engage in other areas of mycology, such as taxonomy, or DNA analysis. In the past many amateurs contributed substially to mycology. Peter Orton comes to mind, a very talented person, but a school teacher by trade. And somewhat myopic by all accounts. I am sure amateurs can still make a worthwhile contribution, by recording fungi, sending specimens to Kew, recording new arrivals to the UK and so on. It does seem to be a Cinderalla science. For my own part, just reading about small red capped boletes is enough to drive me to drink.
If you don't have it Geoffrey Kibby's Boletes book is very good but I still have problems!
'The more I know the more I realise I don't know'

Leif
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Re: How to define a mycologist?

Post by Leif » Fri Aug 14, 2015 9:18 pm

I have in the past used keys on Leccinum and other boletes only to find later that other books come to different conclusions, and DNA analysis gives another story. Some are easy, but brown capped Leccinum and small red capped boletes are challenging, for want of a better word. Too much relies on subtle morphological differences, when fungi are naturally very variable.

Amadan
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Re: How to define a mycologist?

Post by Amadan » Thu Nov 12, 2015 11:24 am

I think that the mycologist - amateur or professional - has to be perhaps the most dedicated of all the varieties of "natural history" enthusiasts. Fungi must be the most difficult of all the macro-organisms, in the UK at least. But they are fascinating! Their biology is remarkable (and they've taxed the taxonomists for decades), they can be eerily beautiful, and occasionally delicious.
I've never attempted to specialise in any wildlife group (though I admit a particular fondness for Adders), but as an interested novice I not only enjoy seeing, photographing, and trying to identify them; I find that the discussions they prompt (here and on other sites) are amongst the most erudite and informative on any subject.
I also think that a certain amount of optimism - and definitely a sense of humour - are essential requisites.

mollisia
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Re: How to define a mycologist?

Post by mollisia » Wed Dec 16, 2015 5:15 am

Hello,
Amadan wrote:Fungi must be the most difficult of all the macro-organisms, in the UK at least.
Hmmm, what about flies, beetles etc .... I think they are even more challenging, when you often be happy to determine to family level ...
Amadan wrote:I also think that a certain amount of optimism - and definitely a sense of humour - are essential requisites.
not to forget a comperatively high frustration tolerance :D

best regards,
Andreas

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FungiJohn
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Re: How to define a mycologist?

Post by FungiJohn » Wed Dec 16, 2015 1:03 pm

mollisia wrote:Hello,
Amadan wrote:Fungi must be the most difficult of all the macro-organisms, in the UK at least.
Hmmm, what about flies, beetles etc .... I think they are even more challenging, when you often be happy to determine to family level ...
Amadan wrote:I also think that a certain amount of optimism - and definitely a sense of humour - are essential requisites.
not to forget a comperatively high frustration tolerance :D

best regards,
Andreas
I so fully agree with your last statement Andreas :D

Best Wishes - John

diggleken
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Re: How to define a mycologist?

Post by diggleken » Fri Dec 18, 2015 10:24 pm

If you think fungi are tough, try Springtails - Collembola. And there are others equally tough.
One of the unfortunate things is there are so few resources and experts, unlike fungi...............
This might give an idea of them in terms of numbers and variety:
http://ws1.roehampton.ac.uk/collembola/ ... index.html
Cheers
Ken

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