A walk to the caves of Brent Scar & Attermire Scar

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Lancashire Lad
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A walk to the caves of Brent Scar & Attermire Scar

Post by Lancashire Lad » Thu May 26, 2016 3:16 pm

This might become the first post describing some of my (occasional) walks in Yorkshire limestone country.
I may change the thread's title if other walks are subsequently uploaded, and if re-titling becomes logical, but for now, this initial post relates solely to a walk to the archaeologically important caves that can be found along the limestone escarpments of Brent, and Attermire Scars, near Settle.

This is an ideal "part-day" walk, in that (in my case) it was not much more than three miles in length, and only involved a couple of hundred metres of ascent. (Although there are other interesting caves/locations in the vicinity, so the walk could easily be extended if needs be).

From my chosen start point beside Clay Pits Plantation, there is a distinct and easily followed track/path along the entire route, so not much chance of going astray, even if the weather turned misty.

The entrance areas of the caves are easily accessed - although care needs to be taken when climbing up the steep grassy slopes of the escarpment, as there is potential for a considerable sliding/tumbling fall. (And more vertiginously so, if you visit the upper edges of the escarpments!).

Worth noting that some of these caves extend for some considerable distances into the hillsides, but unless you are an experienced and properly equipped caver/potholer, only the foolhardy would venture further than common sense dictates.

If you have a passing interest in archaeology, the caves will be fascinating places to explore. Not much to be seen in the way of archaeological evidence these days, but some knowledge of their history, and what's been discovered there, (including, for example, bone spear tips, wire brooches, and a wooden chariot no less!), will add immensely to the walk.

There is some interesting information about the caves and their archaeology here: -
http://oldfieldslimestone.blogspot.co.u ... f-for.html

Regards,
Mike.

Map of my particular walk: -
# Map of Route Walked.jpg
And a few pics from the walk: -
Attachments
01 - Jubilee Cave 1.jpg
Jubilee Cave Entrance(s).
06 - Victoria Cave 1.jpg
Victoria Cave Entrance.
14 - Attermire Scar (Western Aspect).jpg
Attermire Scar - Western Aspect. The obvious dark cleft, (right of centre), is the entrance to Horseshoe Cave.
15 - Attermire Scar (Southern Aspect).jpg
Attermire Scar - Southern Aspect. The entrance to Horseshoe Cave again being seen, this time to left of centre.
12 - Common Spotted Orchids (Attermire Scar).jpg
Common Spotted Orchids flowering in profusion along the grassy slopes of Attermire scar.
13 - Mountain Pansy - Viola lutea (Attermire Scar).jpg
Mountain Pansy, also flowering in profusion. - And by what was seen, some of the local sheep seem to find the flowers of which, something of a delicacy!
Common sense is not so common.

Leif
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Re: A walk to the caves of Brent Scar & Attermire Scar

Post by Leif » Mon Sep 05, 2016 2:34 pm

It looks like a lovely place to visit. But aren't those Early Purple Orchids, or something similar?

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Re: A walk to the caves of Brent Scar & Attermire Scar

Post by Lancashire Lad » Mon Sep 05, 2016 3:51 pm

Leif wrote:It looks like a lovely place to visit. But aren't those Early Purple Orchids, or something similar?
You may well be correct - Early Purple was my thought when I originally saw them.

During the latter part of the walk, when we were almost back at the car, we met and struck up a conversation with an elderly lady, who was apparently a local resident, and who said that she often walked along the escarpment area.

In the course of our conversation, I happened to mention the hundreds of Early Purple Orchids we'd seen. whereupon the lady assured us that the orchids in question were actually Common Spotted's.

I had no reason to question her authoritative identification, as early Purple's and Common Spotted's are often confused - although I still had my niggling doubts - especially as we were on calcareous soil and I didn't recall seeing any signs of leaf spots on any of the leaves.

Getting the pics onto the computer, I didn't think that there was enough detail to be certain one way or the other, so opted, rightly or wrongly, to go with "local knowledge".

Regards,
Mike.
Common sense is not so common.

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NellyDee
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Re: A walk to the caves of Brent Scar & Attermire Scar

Post by NellyDee » Wed Sep 07, 2016 2:32 pm

I am definitely not an expert, but recently I had very similar, if not almost identical orchid ID'd as Fragrant Orchid - google it and I think you will find it looks pretty much the same. This is the one I got ID on
Fragrant Orchid.JPG

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Re: A walk to the caves of Brent Scar & Attermire Scar

Post by marksteer » Thu Sep 08, 2016 7:34 pm

And they need fungi for seeds to germinate and may have a Rust on them!
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Leif
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Re: A walk to the caves of Brent Scar & Attermire Scar

Post by Leif » Sat Sep 10, 2016 6:19 pm

I think we are agreed that them's is orchids. :D I still don't think they are Common Orchids, note the leaves at the base.

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