Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by Lancashire Lad » Wed May 30, 2018 5:26 pm

Thanks Nelly.

Here's another walk I did a few weeks ago: -

Monday 14th May was forecast to be more-or-less sunny all day, so I decided on a another trip to the lake District for a walk up Scafell Pike and Scafell from Wasdale Head.

Setting off from the National Trust car-park at Wasdale Campsite, I walked beside Lingmell Gill up the Brown Tongue route to Hollow Stones, and then onwards to Lingmell Col, before turning south easterly for the final few hundred feet of ascent to Scafell Pike summit.

From there, I descended to Mickledore, and then took the steep and not so well known faint track that skirts the foot of Scafell’s main crags, directly down to the bottom of Lord’s Rake.

Lord’s Rake was loose, slippy, and hard going. – Very much the same awkward scree slope that it was thirty or more years ago when I last climbed it! – But nevertheless, incredibly enjoyable for the views to be had, both looking directly up and back down it, and looking out over the valleys from the tops of each of its sections. – You just don’t get a sense of the scale of things in that area from photos.

Incredibly, (or not – as it happens all too frequently in the Lake District), although there had been more or less wall-to-wall sunshine so far, some extensive banks of mist began to arrive as I made my way up the final section of Lord’s Rake. – Taking the edge off any possibility of getting good scenic photos for the next couple of hours or so.

At the top of Lord’s Rake, it was a simple plod up the last few hundred feet to Scafell’s summit plateau, passing by Symonds Knott and then across to the head of the West Wall Traverse for a look down into Deep Gill – where a group of climbers were enjoying themselves on its almost vertical walls.

A short back-track past Symonds Knott, and up the final few feet to Scafell summit, where I stopped for lunch, and had a lengthy wait around, hoping that the patchy mist would clear!

It began to finally clear after about an hour and a half, so, from Scafell summit, I decided to head down Kettle Cove, towards the Burnmoor Tarn area. Which, depending on time, and my energy levels, would then give me the option of going up over Illgill Head and Whin Rigg, or taking the old corpse road back to Wasdale. Unfortunately, an untimely slip on a loose boulder not long after leaving the Scafell’s summit left me with a slight but niggling knee injury for the rest of the walk that ended any thoughts of my doing Illgill Head etc. – So back down the old corpse road it was!

Regards,
Mike.

GPX Track of the route walked: -
#01GPX Track - 1 to 50000 scale.jpg
Walk Elevation Profile: -
#04 Walk Elevation Profile.jpg
And some photos from the day. (Described in list form below, to ensure correct alignment of thumbnail images).

Photo 01 – Wastwater from the Brown Tongue area of the path from Wasdale, heading towards Scafell Pike: -
Photo 02 – The crags of Scafell, as seen from Hollow Stones area on the approach to Lingmell Col: -
Photo 03 – Great Gable and Styhead Tarn, with Skiddaw and Blencathra on the horizon. (From flanks of Scafell Pike): -
Photo 04 – Great Gable etc., from beside Scafell Pike’s summit triangulation pillar: -
Photo 05 – Scafell’s crags, with Lord’s Rake just right of centre: -
Photo 06 – A “zoomed-in” shot of Lord’s Rake, from the approach to Mickledore: -
Photo 07 – Looking back down the first section of Lord’s rake, with Scafell Pike facing: -
Photo 08 – Looking back towards the first section of Lord’s Rake, & Scafell Pike beyond: -
Photo 09 – A minute later, and the view back to Scafell Pike and Lord’s Rake first section becomes enveloped in mist: -
Photo 10 – Yewbarrow as seen from beside Fence Wood, on the Old Corpse Road: -
Photo 11 – Looking up to Scafell Pike from the old corpse road, on the approach to Brackenclose: -
Photo 12 – The Scafells, from Lingmell Gill bridge. (Just behind the National Trust carpark at Wasdale): -


If you would like to see more photos from this walk, see: - https://www.walklakes.co.uk/talk/viewto ... ?f=2&t=580
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by Lancashire Lad » Sun Jun 10, 2018 2:08 pm

Thursday, 24th May was forecast to be a fine sunny day, so I made another trip to the Lake District with the idea of walking the Fairfield Horseshoe. - I'd previously been up most of the fells involved, but had never made a point of doing the actual Horseshoe.

Making an early start, I parked the car in the Lake Road carpark at Ambleside, at about 7:30am, and was pleased to discover that (at that particular carpark) a trial "Earlybird Offer" was in place, meaning that anyone arriving before 9am could park all day for just £1.00 - bargain!!!! (NB: that offer runs until end of June, so just a few weeks to go for anyone who might want to take advantage of it).

From the carpark, I made my way through Ambleside's almost deserted early morning streets, to Nook End Farm and Low Sweden Bridge, where the fell-walk proper would begin.
A few paces beyond Low Sweden Bridge brings you out onto the open fellside, where the ridge-line path follows a drystone wall all the way up the fells to Dove Crag.

I added a little extra to the walk by doing a there & back detour across to the cairn on High Bakestones. This is off the line of the main horseshoe path, but for the little extra effort involved, offers some fine views over to the eastern fells.

Navigation on some of these tops visited can be problematical in bad weather. E.g., once on Fairfield’s summit plateau, there are several cairned paths on the expansive flat top, so map & compass skills can be needed to ensure that you are heading in your correct chosen direction. However, on a fine day you’d really have to be trying to get lost. (Although, some people still do :shock: :roll: ).

Quite a long walk at over thirteen miles, so not to be underestimated, but with plenty of stunning views along the way.

Regards,
Mike.

GPX Track of the route walked: -
#02 GPX Track - 1 to 50000 Scale.jpg
Walk Elevation Profile: -
#04 Walk Elevation Profile.jpg
And some photos from the day. (Described in list form below, to ensure correct alignment of thumbnail images).

Photo 01 – Looking back to Ambleside, from High Sweden Coppice area: -
Photo 02 – Looking up to Sweden Crag (left), and Brock Crags (right of centre): -
Photo 03 – The drystone wall that follows the ridgeline. – With Low Pike and High Pike prominent on the horizon: -
Photo 04 – Looking towards Place Fell and Angletarn Pikes from High Bakestones: -
Photo 05 – Looking north-east, to Place Fell and Angletarn Pikes. – From Dove Crag summit plateau: -
Photo 06 – Hutaple Crag and Deepdale, from the flanks of Fairfield: -
Photo 07 – Cofa Pike and St, Sunday Crag – from the flanks of Fairfield: -
Photo 08 – Great Gable and Fleetwith Pike, (from Fairfield), seen across Seat Sandal, Steel Fell, Glaramara, etc.: -
Photo 09 – Looking back to Rydal Head from the ridgeline path towards Heron Pike: -
Photo 10 – A zoomed-in close up of Bowfell and the Scafell’s, with the Langdale Pikes in front. (From ridgeline approach to Heron Pike): -
Photo 11 – Looking down to Grasmere: -
Photo 12 – Looking down to the final part of the walk. – The view back to Ambleside and Windermere, (with part of Rydal Water at right hand side), as seen from Nab Scar: -

If you would like to see a more extensive description, and lots more photos from this walk, see: - https://www.walklakes.co.uk/talk/viewto ... ?f=2&t=585
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by Lancashire Lad » Thu Jun 28, 2018 1:47 pm

Tuesday, 5th June was forecast to be a nice day, so, another trip to the Lake District - to do the Kentmere Horseshoe.
During the walk, I decided to include High Street and Goat Scar as two “extra” summits. These two aren’t considered part of the usual horseshoe, but the legs were feeling good on the day, and both tops offer some very good views.
The walk was over 14 miles long, with total ascents of over 4000ft. – It took 7¾hr, start to finish, with actual moving time of 6hr 10min.

I started from the obvious location – the small parking area between the village hall and the telephone kiosk, (opposite St, Cuthbert's Church), and was quite happy to pay the suggested donation of £3.00 for all day parking. – After all, the parking area is on private land which has to be maintained. (There is an honesty box embedded into the side of the village hall wall).

From the village hall, I walked towards the Nook, and then between the buildings there, making sure to keep on the correct route in order to pick up the path going up the Garburn Pass. At the head of the pass there is an obvious point to turn northwards towards Yoke, the first main fell of the day, and the beginning of the ridge route around the horseshoe itself.

Unfortunately, Kentmere Reservoir, prominent at several places around the horseshoe, is currently completely drained, and is a bit of a blot on the otherwise stunning landscape.
I understand that it is in private ownership and something of a financial burden due to legislation requiring the maintenance of various safety standards. – It could well be that it never gets refilled!

Regards,
Mike.

GPX Track of the route walked: -
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#GPX Track - 1 to 50000 Scale.jpg
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Walk Elevation Profile: -
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And some photos from the day. (Described in list form below, to ensure correct alignment of thumbnail images).

Photo 01 – Looking towards “The Nook”, with Goat House Scar, Cowsty Knotts, etc., on horizon. (From beside the village hall in Kentmere).
Photo 02 – Looking up the Garburn Pass, with Buck Crag prominent at right hand side.
Photo 03 – A completely drained Kentmere Reservoir, with Mardale Ill Bell, Nan Bield Pass, and Harter Fell, all to be visited later in this walk, on the horizon.
Photo 04 – A view towards Froswick from Ill Bell. – Mist gradually clearing over Thornthwaite Beacon and High Street in the far distance.
Photo 05 – Looking back towards Ill Bell from Froswick.
Photo 06 – Approaching Thornthwaite Beacon.
Photo 07 – Looking back to High Street, with Kidsty Pike in distance. – (From the flanks of Mardale Ill Bell).
Photo 08 – Small Water and Haweswater Reservoir, from the flanks of Harter Fell.
Photo 09 – Fell ponies on the ridge between Harter Fell and Kentmere Pike. - With a now distant Thornthwaite Beacon just about visible (centre shot) on the horizon.
Photo 10 – A view down Longsleddale, from beside the summit cairn on Goat Scar.
Photo 11 – Yoke, (Rainsborrow Crag), Ill Bell, Froswick, etc., as seen from Stile End Farm.
Photo 12 – A final look back at the horseshoe, taken on the approach back to Kentmere, and showing most of the fells visited on this walk. – ( From left to right: Yoke, Ill Bell, Froswick, part of Thornthwaite Beacon, High Street, Mardale Ill Bell, Harter Fell, and the flanks of Kentmere Pike ): -

If you would like to see more photos from this walk, see: - https://www.walklakes.co.uk/talk/viewto ... ?f=2&t=586

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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by Lancashire Lad » Sun Jul 08, 2018 1:03 pm

With a glorious day pretty much guaranteed, in the extended spell of dry sunny weather we’re having, I made another trip to the Lake District on Monday 2nd July, intent on walking Langstrath, a valley I hadn't previously visited, along with Glaramara and Allen Crags, – two fells that I hadn't visited in many a year.
I started from the National Trust car park beside the Old Dungeon Ghyll Hotel in Great Langdale, walking along Mickleden valley and then over the Stake Pass, descending into Langstrath by the steep but well defined zig-zag path.

I then followed Langstrath Beck along the valley floor, passing below Cam Crag and visiting Black Moss Pot, before continuing onwards to Stonethwaite, (passing through Stonethwaite Farm Campsite along the way).

Then came a short road walk over to Strands Bridge on the B5289, there turning back onto the fellside to pick up the Combe Gill path towards Thornythwaite Fell.

From Thornythwaite Fell, I continued on the ascending ridgeline path to Glaramara, and onwards to Allen Crags. From there, descending to Esk Hause, and taking the Tongue Head path to Angle Tarn and the head of Rossett Ghyll, before the final descent back to Mickleden and the valley walk back to the O.D.G. Hotel and the car.

Although it was quite a long walk at 17.9 miles, the total time taken (11hr. 44min), wasn't really representative for the mileage. Actual moving time was 8hr. 49min. - The day was very warm indeed, with little in the way of a breeze, and besides stopping for lunch, taking photographs, and a lengthy conversation with two elderly ladies, numerous short breaks were also taken just to take in the scenery and mop the brow! :D

I’d set off carrying 2½ litres of drinks, but the day was so warm that I needed to top that up with a further 2 litres of water from streams before the walk was completed. - I'm a little bit wary of drinking stream water these days, so when that's necessary, (and if I'm not carrying a water filter), I use water purification tablets. - They weigh next to nothing, and I always carry a few in the rucksack, "just in case".

On the day, some sort of problem with the camera resulted in all photos taken between Black Moss Pot and the start of the climb to Thornythwaite Fell, (in and around Stonethwaite area). disappearing by the time I came to upload the files to the computer.
Somewhat frustrating, as I don’t now have a photographic record of that section of the walk. – I have no idea what might have happened, but have since replaced the memory card to (hopefully!) prevent a reoccurrence.

Other than for that little niggle, it was another superb day out on the Lakeland fells.

Regards,
Mike.

GPX Track of the route walked: -
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#GPX Track - 1 to 50000 Scale.jpg
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Walk Elevation Profile: -
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# Walk Elevation Profile.jpg
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And some photos from the day. (Described in list form below, to ensure correct alignment of thumbnail images).

Photo 01 – The Langdale Pikes. (Seen from the roadside near Elterwater, on the approach to Great Langdale).
Photo 02 – A Red Deer hind. – One of several seen across Mickleden valley, (near to Stool End Farm), not long after starting the walk.
Photo 03 – Looking back along Mickleden towards the walk’s starting point, from part way up on the ascent of Stake Pass.
Photo 04 – The Crinkle Crags – Bowfell – Esk Pike vista, as seen from the cairn at the top of Stake Pass.
Photo 05 – A zoomed in close-up of Bowfell’s crags, (Great Slab prominent in centre), as seen from Stake Pass summit plateau.
Photo 06 – A little further on, and Langstrath comes into view. (Cam Crag prominent across the valley).
Photo 07 – Looking down into the crystal clear water of Langstrath Beck at Black Moss Pot.
Photo 08 – Looking towards a distant Skiddaw, Blencathra, Derwentwater etc. – From the flanks of Glaramara.
Photo 09 – A useful looking wind shelter at Glaramara summit. (Although definitely not needed on a day like this!). – With Great Gable etc. in the background.
Photo 10 – A close-up of Pike O’Stickle, from Glaramara’s summit plateau.
Photo 11 – The Langdale Pikes, viewed across two of the many small tarns seen on the ridgeline between Glaramara and Allen Crags.
Photo 12 – Looking across Angle Tarn to Hanging Knotts crags, at the northern end of Bowfell.

If you would like to see a more extensive description, and lots more photos from this walk, see: - https://www.walklakes.co.uk/talk/viewto ... =594#p1227

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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by NellyDee » Sat Aug 11, 2018 2:18 pm

What a lovely walk - amazing scenery. Photo 7 reminds me of a favourite stopping place in Glen Etive where the water flows between a deep sided ravine. how clear the water is.

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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by Lancashire Lad » Wed Mar 06, 2019 3:29 pm

A rather belated thanks for your comment, Nelly! :oops: ;)
Things have been fairly quiet on the fungi front lately, so I thought I’d catch up on this thread with details of a couple of recent walks.

The weather forecast for Saturday 2nd February had suggested a sunny winter’s day. – Although, as things turned out, the day became very much a day of two halves. - The morning was mostly very overcast with a bitterly cold wind. However, by the time I reached Pavey Ark’s North Rake, the sun began to break through again, and, with the wind dying down, the afternoon became much more pleasant!

Temperature on the fells was pretty much below freezing all day, with icy patches on all paths from valley level upwards.
General snowline was at about 1000ft, and snow depth increased significantly from there up to the fell-tops.
Walking was quite arduous for much of the time, as the often deep and drifted snow was mostly soft and not yet fully compacted.

I was carrying crampons and ice axe, but with the deep soft snow there was no real need to use them. The walking poles definitely came in handy though! – And pull-on micro-spikes were very useful on the mixed icy / rocky terrain of the lower level frozen paths.

I started the walk from the National Trust car park beside the Stickle Barn at New Dungeon Ghyll Hotel, and followed the Stickle Ghyll path
up to Stickle Tarn. From the dam, I walked around the tarn in front of Pavey Ark, before making my way over to the start of North Rake.

I ascended North Rake to Pavey Ark summit, and then followed the ridgeline around to Harrison Stickle summit. From there I headed westwards, (generally towards Pike O’Stickle), to pick up the Thorn Crag path. Then descending beside Dungeon Ghyll, down to the knoll of Pike Howe, before making the final descent back to valley level and the carpark.

Regards,
Mike.

GPX Track of the route walked: -
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#GPS Track - 1 to 50000 Scale.jpg
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Walk Elevation Profile: -
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# Walk Elevation Profile.jpg
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And some photos from the day. (Described in list form below, to ensure correct alignment of thumbnail images).
These images only give a taster of the walk. - If you would like to see a more extensive description, and lots more photos from this walk, see: -
https://www.walklakes.co.uk/talk/viewto ... ?f=2&t=649
.

Photo 01 – The Langdale Pikes, as seen before sunrise. – (From beside the cattlegrid, on the B5343 approach to the hamlet of Elterwater).
Photo 02 – Looking up Stickle Ghyll to Tarn Crag just after sunrise. (At this stage it looked like it was going to be a beautiful winter’s morning!).
Photo 03 – Unfortunately, dark clouds and a bitterly cold wind quickly came in with a vengeance! – Looking back down towards the valley, with Wetherlam etc. in the far distance. – From the upper part of the Stickle Ghyll path.
Photo 04 – Looking across a partly frozen Stickle Tarn to Pavey Ark – with its summit lost in the clag. – (Taken from Stickle Tarn dam).
Photo 05 – Looking down North Rake. – The ridge of Blea Rigg in mid-ground, and a still cloudy Fairfield range of fells on the horizon.
Photo 06 – More sunshine now. – Looking up the roughly 50° steep slope, towards the top of North Rake.
Photo 07 – Looking across to Harrison Stickle from Pavey Ark summit area.
Photo 08 – Pavey Ark and Stickle Tarn, with the eastern fells vista beyond. – From Harrison Stickle summit.
Photo 09 – Crinkle Crags and Bowfell, with Loft Crag in mid-ground, and part of Pike O’Stickle at far right. – From Harrison Stickle summit.
Photo 10 – Looking down into the Dungeon Ghyll ravine. – Taken from the Thorn Crag path on the descent to Pike Howe.
Photo 11 – The crags of Harrison Stickle, as seen from Pike Howe.
Photo 12 – Last shot of the day, and a similar view, (taken from the same location), to the first shot of the day – but with the Langdale Pikes now in bathed in full afternoon sunlight.
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by Lancashire Lad » Wed Mar 06, 2019 3:59 pm

The winter so far has been very mild, particularly so in the past few weeks, with almost all of the late January and early February snow on the high fells having now melted. The weather forecast for Tuesday 26th February was for a continuation of the unseasonally high temperatures, with a fine, sunny day, and light winds expected. On that basis, I decided to make another trip to the Lake District, with intentions of doing (yet again!) one of my favourite walks – Helvellyn via Striding Edge, along with several other tops.

I started the walk from a rough gravelly pull-in on Greenside Road in Glenridding, making my way across Rattlebeck Bridge, and walking towards Littlecove and my favoured Mires Beck route up the fellside. The path beside Mires Beck is well defined and easy to follow, and leads directly up the fellside to a drystone wall, where it then turns to follow the wall upwards before diverting northwards towards Birkhouse Moor’s more northerly “summit”.

After visiting the cairn there, the wall was picked up again, being then followed along the ridge, past Birkhouse Moor’s true summit, (which is located immediately beside the wall, and which is approximately 10m higher than the “north summit”), to the “hole-in-the-wall”, from where it is just a short distance to Low & High Spying How, and Striding Edge. Once across Striding Edge, it was up to Helvellyn summit, and then along the ridge across the summits of Nethermost Pike, High Crag, and Dollywaggon Pike, before descending to Grisedale Tarn.

Crossing the stepping stones at the tarn’s outlet, I then made my way up to Deepdale Hause, and onwards to St. Sunday Crag summit, (where I had a late lunch break), before making the lengthy descent back to valley level, contouring around the flanks of Birks, and down Thornhow End. Then, a very short stretch of road before crossing the valley towards the Kennels, followed by a slight ascent to pass by the side of Lanty’s Tarn, (adjacent to the small knoll of Keldas), before continuing onwards back to Glenridding and the car.

Regards,
Mike.

GPX Track of the route walked: -
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# GPS Track - 1 to 50000 scale.jpg
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Walk Elevation Profile: -
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# Walk Elevation Profile.jpg
.
And some photos from the day. (Described in list form below, to ensure correct alignment of thumbnail images).
These images only give a taster of the walk. - If you would like to see a more extensive description, and lots more photos from this walk, see: -
https://www.walklakes.co.uk/talk/viewto ... ?f=2&t=652
.

Photo 01 – Looking towards Rattlebeck Cottage, with Littlecove in the distance. – (Before sunrise, the moon showing just above the horizon).
Photo 02 – The view back towards Glenridding from Littlecove, with early morning sunshine now catching the fells.
Photo 03 – First glimpse of Helvellyn, as the ridgeline near the summit of Birkhouse Moor is reached.
Photo 04 – Looking back across Birkhouse Moor from the hole-in-the-wall.
Photo 05 – Looking along Striding Edge towards Helvellyn.
Photo 06 – Looking back along Striding Edge from about half way up the Lad Crag headwall.
Photo 07 – The eastern vista from the Ordnance Survey triangulation pillar at Helvellyn’s summit.
Photo 08 – Yours truly at Helvellyn summit. – (Red Tarn below, and the upper part of Viking Buttress in shadow behind).
Photo 09 – Now walking towards Nethermost Pike, and a zoomed-in shot looking back to the awkward “chimney” section of Striding Edge: -
(Spot the walkers, (circled). – One who has just climbed down the chimney and is now making his way towards the start of the Lad Crag headwall to Helvellyn’s summit, and the other, who has already started the ascent of the headwall).
Photo 10 – St. Sunday Crag as seen from the upper flanks of Dollywaggon Pike at the beginning of the descent to Grisedale Tarn.
Photo 11 – Grisedale Tarn from Deepdale Hause, with Dollywaggon Pike and its crags prominent. – (High Crag on horizon at far right).
Photo 12 – Almost at the end of the walk now, and a shot of Lanty’s Tarn. – Thornhow End, my descent route back to valley level, can be seen across the tarn.
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by adampembs » Thu Mar 07, 2019 12:08 am

All lovely photos, but the last one of the tarn really makes me wish i was there.
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by Lancashire Lad » Sun Apr 14, 2019 12:23 pm

Cheers Adam, - I know what you mean, but I have to admit that all my favourite spots in the Lake District are amongst the fell-tops.

Here's another, from last Thursday: - The forecast was for a bright sunny day, with increasing cloud appearing during the afternoon.
I wanted a relatively short walk due to commitments elsewhere later in the day, so I decided upon Blencathra. – Ascent by Sharp Edge, and descent by Hall’s Fell Ridge. – It’s a walk, (or a variation of what are usually longer walks), I’ve done several times both in summer and winter, and which never fails to impress.

As things turned out weather-wise, the morning wasn’t quite as good as expected; with quite a bit of cloud around, giving some lengthy overcast spells between sunny intervals. Things improved towards lunchtime, with much less cloud in the afternoon. It was a strange sort of day, with lots of atmospheric UV haze around. – (Which makes photography somewhat difficult by muting colour, and preventing clear views of the distant fells).

Starting from a layby on the eastbound carriageway of the A66, near to Doddick, I walked generally north-eastwards, picking up the footpath behind the White Horse Inn at Scales. Then contouring around Scales Fell towards Mousthwaite Comb. Approaching Mousthwaite Comb, the path takes a more north westerly direction, running parallel with River Glenderamackin towards Mungrisdale Common. Eventually that path reaches Scales Beck, at which point I crossed the beck and made the short ascent up to Scales Tarn.

From the tarn, I made my way up to the start of Sharp Edge, stopping for a bite to eat and a drink before continuing. Sharp Edge was in fine condition, with bone dry rocks and very little wind to consider. It was quickly followed by an enjoyable scramble up Foule Crag, and then owards to Blencathra summit, with a quick detour onto the plateau of Blencathra’s “Saddle”, to photograph the White Cross Memorial.

The replacement for the “stolen” OS trigonometrical station ring had recently been installed at the summit, so I took a few photos before descending via Hall’s Fell ridge, back to valley level at Gategill. Once back in the valley, it was a short walk of about half a mile or so along the A66 back to Doddick and the car.

Regards,
Mike.

GPX Track of the route walked: -
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#GPS Track - 1 to 25000 scale.jpg
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Walk Elevation Profile: -
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#Walk Elevation Profile.jpg
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And some photos from the day. (Described in list form below, to ensure correct alignment of thumbnail images).

Photo 01 – Sharp Edge comes into sight. - Taken from the path contouring Scales Fell towards Mungrisdale Common: -
Photo 02 – A close-up shot of Sharp Edge, taken from the same viewpoint: -
Photo 03 – Looking across Scales Tarn to Sharp Edge: -
Photo 04 – A close-up of part of Sharp Edge, from the same viewpoint: -
Photo 05 – Looking back across Sharp Edge, from just beyond the “bad step”: -
Photo 06 – Scales Tarn and Sharp Edge, with Bannerdale Crags in the distance. (Taken from Blencathra’s Saddleback ridgeline): -
Photo 07 – Looking towards Derwentwater and the fells beyond, from Blencathra summit: -
Photo 08 – The newly installed, and “crowd funded” replacement for the OS Trigonometrical Station Ring at Blencathra’s summit.
(The original ring, of which there is a photo in this walk report: - viewtopic.php?f=11&t=695&start=48#p8390 was stolen from this spot in 2018): -
Photo 09 – The view across the ridgeline leading to Doddick Fell. – Taken from near the top of Hall’s Fell ridge: -
Photo 10 – Looking towards Derwentwater, across Gategill Fell. – From Hall’s Fell ridge: -
Photo 11 – Looking down Hall’s Fell ridge: -
Photo 12 – Almost back down to valley level, and the final shot of the day. - Looking up to Hall’s Fell ridge and Blencathra’s summit, from the old and long abandoned lead mine area at Gategill: -

If you would like to see more photos from this walk, see: - https://www.walklakes.co.uk/talk/viewto ... ?f=2&t=659
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Common sense is not so common.

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NellyDee
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by NellyDee » Thu May 30, 2019 9:44 am

Lovely to see your walks makes me quite envious. Been a while since I followed you.

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Lancashire Lad
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by Lancashire Lad » Thu May 30, 2019 3:44 pm

Thanks once again, Nelly. - Your comments are always appreciated!

My last walk up Blencathra, (described in my previous post, above), was a short up-down affair via Sharp Edge and Hall's Fell Ridge.
This time though, my walk would be near enough three times the distance, and with more than twice the overall ascent.

I’d been thinking about doing this particular walk for some time, as it would pass by the “Cloven Stone” on Mungrisdale Common. – And, Sunday 12th May, (forecast to be fine and sunny, with light winds, and maximum temperature of 16°c.), looked like the ideal opportunity!
Mentioned in Wainwright’s “Pictorial Guide to The Northern Fells”, the Cloven Stone is one of the Lake District’s many oddities I’d been wanting to see!

If you would like to see a more extensive description of the route walked, plus lots more photos, see: -
https://www.walklakes.co.uk/forum/viewt ... ?f=2&t=672

Regards,
Mike.

GPX Track of the route walked, (Yellow dotted line is track of my much shorter Blencathra walk on 11th April.): -
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#GPS Track - 1 to 50000 scale modified.jpg
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Walk Elevation Profile: -
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#Walk Elevation Profile.jpg
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And a few photos from the day. (Described in list form below, to ensure correct alignment of thumbnail images).

Photo 01 – Not long after starting the walk, and the view across to Wolf Crags, Great Dodd, Clough Head etc. (From the flanks of Scales Fell): -
Photo 02 – Looking across the flanks of Hall’s Fell to Threlkeld village, and the central Lakeland fells beyond. (From near the summit of Scales Fell): -
Photo 03 – Part of Sharp Edge, seen from the top of Foule Crag, just after crossing Atkinson Pike summit: -
Photo 04 – Into the back of beyond! – The faint track heading across Mungrisdale Common. – (Skiddaw on horizon towards left hand side): -
Photo 05 – The Cloven Stone. – (Unfortunately with strong sunlight from directly behind). – But the photo shows the split through the boulder, from which it gets its “Cloven Stone” name.
Photo 06 – The Cloven Stone: -
Photo 07 – The footbridge over Salehow Beck, leading to Skiddaw House in the distance. – (Skiddaw on the horizon beyond): -
Photo 08 – The old and rather decrepit looking Ordnance Survey Triangulation Pillar at Skiddaw summit. – (Blencathra and Mungrisdale Common, from where I’d just walked, can be seen beyond, at left hand side of shot): -
Photo 09 – Derwentwater & Borrowdale, as seen on the long descent towards Latrigg: -
Photo 10 – Just before reaching the Underscar parking area, and the Hawell Monument is passed: -
Photo 11 – Approaching Brundholme: -
Photo 12 – Looking across to Knowe Crags and Gategill Fell on Blencathra. – (From the footpath between Wescoe and Threlkeld): -
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Re: Perfect Morning - (Revisited!)

Post by Lancashire Lad » Mon Sep 16, 2019 12:28 pm

The mountain weather forecast had said that Saturday 14th September would bring sunny periods from dawn, with winds increasing steadily throughout the day, and with a 99% certainty of cloud free fell tops. – How wrong they were!!! – Apart from a short period soon after dawn, the tops, (certainly in the area of my walk), were soon enveloped in thick mist and murk, which persisted throughout most of the walk, only clearing during the final descent back to the car. The wind on the tops was extremely strong and gusting, at times making progress quite difficult.

I started the walk from the Three Shire Stone area of the Wrynose Pass. (Note that the Three Shire Stone, which was damaged by a car not long after its full restoration a few years back, is yet to be reinstated).
My initial ascent was up Wet Side Edge and over Hell Gill Pike to Little Carrs. And from there, contouring across the fell to pick up the track to Grey Friar. (The one fell-top included on this walk that I hadn’t previously visited).
From Grey Friar, I backtracked to the col, then contouring around to Levers Hawse, before continuing along the main ridge path to the Old Man of Coniston. Then, it was down to Goat’s Hawse before a there and back ascent to Dow Crag summit. Once back at Goat’s Hawse, I took the diagonally ascending path directly back to Levers Hawse before continuing onwards and upwards to Swirl How summit.
From there, I walked around to Great Carrs summit, paying my respects at the Halifax bomber memorial on the way, before continuing down the ridge back to Little Carrs, and a reversal of the morning’s initial ascent – over Hell Gill Pike, down Wet Side Edge and back to the car.

Whilst the weather was not what I had hoped for, it did conspire to show me something that I’ve wanted to see for all the years that I’ve been fell-walking – a Brocken Spectre! – And that in itself made this walk something that will long be remembered.

GPX Track of the route walked: -
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#GPS Track - 1 to 50000 scale.jpg
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Walk Elevation Profile: -
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#Walk Elevation Profile.JPG
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And some photos from the day. (Described in list form below, to ensure correct alignment of thumbnail images).

Photo 01 – First shot of the day, and the weather still looking promising. – Looking across to Pike O'Blisco from lower slopes of Wet Side Edge.
Photo 02 – Further up Wet Side Edge, and a distant Brocken Spectre begins to appear, only to disappear just as quickly.
Photo 03 – Ever so slightly higher up the slope, just a few seconds later, and a much better Brocken Spectre appeared.
Photo 04 – The spectre looked quite gigantic when compared to the white car in the valley below. But the bank of mist was moving very fast, and fast disappearing, taking all final glimpses of the spectre with it.
Photo 05 – The Matterhorn Rock on Grey Friar summit plateau.
Photo 06 – After visiting the mist enveloped Grey Friar summit, I backtracked to the col, and then contoured across to Levers Hawse. A brief clearing gave this view down towards Levers Water.
Photo 07 – But the mist quickly came back in, with nothing to see until reaching the summit cairn of The Old Man of Coniston, - The summit cairn, with the Ordnance Survey trig pillar in the background, and the OS benchmark arrow on one of the foreground rocks.
Photo 08 – A closer view of the 19th century Ordnance Survey benchmark arrow, engraved into the stone.
Photo 09 – Almost back to Levers Hawse, and the mist had lifted over towards Seathwaite Tarn. (Harter Fell at right, in the distance).
The wind was blowing so hard at this point I could hardly stand up. – I took nine shots here before I got one that looked sharp!
Photo 10 – The mist lifts, allowing a view from Swirl How towards Great Carrs. – Wreckage of a Halifax Bomber visible below the crags.
Photo 11 – The simple memorial cairn, commemorating the crew of the Halifax bomber that crashed here on Great Carrs in 1944.
Photo 12 – Looking back up the ridge from Wet Side Edge to Little Carrs, Great Carrs, and Swirl How. (Part of Wetherlam at left hand side).

If you would like to see a more detailed GPX track, and more photos from this walk, see: -
https://www.walklakes.co.uk/forum/viewt ... ?f=2&t=703

Regards,
Mike.
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Common sense is not so common.

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